by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether super-sized or handheld, Colette Fu’s pop-up books marvel in both content and structure. Her work provides 3-D insight into places and cultures across the globe. And even in small doses, her ability to build upon and enhance photographs create enormous experiences.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Paul McCarthy’s work traverses sculpture, painting, installation art, and film, and all are showcased in his new show, aptly titled “Mixed Bag.” The show at Xavier Hufkens in Belgium, running through May 25 at the venue, takes over both of their gallery spaces. From his malformed figures to recent political reflections in video, the 73-year-old’s work from the past two decades is shown.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Artistic duo Coarse’s recent, entrancing sculpture “States of Matter” comes in two editions of the character Noop: “Trance” and “Cosmos.” The former is a lighthearted, jaunting visit to the beach, while the later takes on a more ominous narrative as Noop moves through water. The pair’s sculptures, entrancing in both details and unexpected narratives, take on a markedly seasonal tone with this release.

by Andy SmithPosted on

David Altmejd‘s mindbending sculptures return in a new show at White Cube Hong Kong. In “The Vibrating Man,” running through May 18, the artist offers his transforming figures and busts, each its on unsettling, yet absorbing mutation. Instead of any given piece having its own meaning, the artist has said he prefer “it to be able to generate its own meaning.” Altmejd was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michael Johansson’s massive sculptures simulate the runners, sprues, and parts that comprise model kits through injection molding. The artist’s public work, which are bronze and aluminum casts, have a particularly playful quality, whether simulating a “firefighter starter kit” or unassembled parts that would build a domestic living space.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Peter Palfi‘s “Looney Tombs” series, the mythologies of Ancient Egyptian gods and 20th-century animation synthesize with artifacts faithful to both histories. The Hungarian artist uses bronze, wood, resin, actual mummified animals, and other materials to craft these sculptures—along with his own complete Book of the Dead. For some, it may recall Damien Hirst’s “Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable,” though Palfi’s work, in concept, wholly embraces the absurd.