by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott Musgrove’s 7.5-foot-tall, 12-foot-wide triptych “The Sanctuary” is finally complete. The artist spent nearly three years on the piece—made from oil on panel, wood, bronze, and glass—while simultaneously working on shows and other projects. (Musgrove was last featured on HiFructose.com here.) Below, the artist shares exclusive commentary on the creation of this piece with Hi-Fructose.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Luo Li Rong’s figurative sculptures evoke movement and intrigue, whether it’s the artist’s feminine, graceful figures or her otherworldly creatures. The China-born, Belgium-based artist has received several high honors, including commissions for the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing. A statement talks about the varied influences of the sculptor.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ellen Jewett’s handsculpted and handpainted “natural history surrealist sculptures” add surreal and sometimes-whimsical touches to wild creatures. Her recent works include the fantastical “the burden of motion and ambition” bear, which seems ripped from its own narrative, and the winged “”of illumination and empathy.” Jewett was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Kate MacDowell‘s handsculpted, porcelain creatures and plantlife look at both the vulnerability and power of the natural world. The artist says she choses “porcelain for its luminous and ghostly qualities as well as its strength and ability to show fine texture.” MacDowell is featured in the Hi-Fructose Collected 4 boxset.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The surreal sculptures of Samuel Salcedo add both distortion and vulnerability to the human form. The Spanish artist plays with texture and scale, creating intimacy in both nude figures and massive faces adorning gallery walls. Most of the pieces carry humor: All of them are packed with bare humanity.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jannick Deslauriers uses textiles to create ghostly, massive sculptures. Whether it’s a time-worn car or a cityscape, her works appear as structures that can be passed through. She uses darker threads as her “pencil outlines,” blending textures and techniques to create pieces that resemble little else.