by Andy SmithPosted on

Mari Shimizu’s dolls contain worlds. The Japanese artist crafts surreal, disconcerting figures whose torsos are often hollowed and reveal views into scenes ripped from mythology. The work is both a new transformation for the classical doll and a nod to the centuries-old nature of the toys.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ron Mueck gathers 100 individual, enormous skulls for a new installation at National Gallery of Victoria’s Triennial. The sculptures in “Mass” are crafted from fiberglass and resin, and each is about a meter high. Mueck’s hyperrealist work was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Christopher David White says that “human is to nature as skin is to bark – as roots are to veins.” The artist’s striking ceramic sculptures attempt to reconcile humanity’s rightful relationship with the natural world, one long abandoned for consumption and convenience. The artist was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Yinka Shonibare MBE blends fiberglass figures, Dutch wax-printed cotton fabric, metal, handpainted globes, and more to craft sculptures that explore race, economics, and other social issues. The artist’s mixing of textures, materials, and cultural iconography offers complexity past an initial scan. He was last featured on HiFructose.com.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Daniel Agdag’s whimsical, complex sculptures are crafted entirely out of cardboard and depict outlandish machines. The Australian artist, who’s also a filmmaker, labels his work “sketching with cardboard,” as he doesn’t use intricate planning, measuring, or sketching to pull off each piece, despite its meticulous appearance. Instead, the plays with the components until pleased.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Hi-Fructose co-founder Daniel “Attaboy” Seifert offers a new collection of work in a show at Corey Helford Gallery next month. Seifert says that in creating the pieces for “Grow in the Dark,” he was “building paintings,” layering several pieces of wood into 2.5D reliefs. The show kicks off Dec. 2 and runs through Jan. 6. This collection, with themes of mortality, mutation, and rebirth, is the artist’s first show in several years.