by Andy SmithPosted on

South African artist Mary Sibande explores race, history, gender, and other social themes, her visceral mixed-media figures constructed from fiberglass, cotton, resin, and other materials. She uses a sculptural representation of herself, Sophie, to also look at her own family’s generational narrative. Her practice also includes photography, integrating the themes of her sculptures and installations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Studio KCA used 5 tons of plastic waste pulled from the Pacific Ocean to construct a 4-story-tall whale, part of the 2018 Bruges Triennial. Dubbed “Skyscraper,” the work is “a reminder of the 150,000,000 tons of plastic waste still swimming in our waters.” Studio KCA worked with the Hawaii Wildlife Fund and the Surfrider Foundation Kaui Chapter to collect the waste used.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Daniele Papuli’s amorphous sculptures are crafted with the unlikely material of paper. The artist is able to use varying techniques in order to shape the material into forms and textures not typical to this source. A statement gives some insight into how he views paper:

by Andy SmithPosted on

Alessandro Gallo‘s ceramic human-animal characters are often caught in the most candid and casual moments. Gallo’s garnered a reputation for these hybrid creatures, such as the one above, currently featured in the “Ceramics Now” show at The International Museum of Ceramics in Faenza.

by Andy SmithPosted on

While sand art is a typical beachside art attraction, Daniel Popper crafts towering, shamanistic sculptures that appear to grow out of the earth. The artist’s sensibility calls back to both centuries-old traditions, contemporaries such as Ray Villafane, and his own, complex figurative style, comprised of thousands of pieces. The Cape Town native also specializes in puppetry, stage design, and other forms, which appear to play into his enormous public art installations. The top piece, “Ven a la Luz,” was created over a month for the Art With Me festival in Tulum, Mexico.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The duo Santissimi, comprised of artists Sara Renzetti and Antonello Serra, use the body to both examine humanity and use its elements for new creations. While the contortions and dissections would supposedly bring expressions of agony, the tranquility of the subjects implies a greater purpose in these explorations.