by Andy SmithPosted on

Hiromi Tango textile work functions as both static, otherworldly growths in galleries across the globe and elements activated through performance art. Yet, much of the artist’s work is also about connecting directly with the artist, via performances that activate her writhing forms. Recent work has also taken her vision outside of traditional spaces.

by Andy SmithPosted on

South Korean artist Lee Bul creates sculptures and installations that move between dystopian techno-monsters and objects pulled from ruinous cityscapes. Emerging out of the late 1980s, Bul has examined urbanization, mythology, and societal “progress” in major exhibitions and shows. Earlier this year, she nabbed the annual, prestigious Ho-Am Prize.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Benedetto Bufalino’s public installations subvert our notions of an object’s function, whether it’s converting an entire city bus into a pool or a telephone booth into an aquarium. Many of his recent projects have occupied spaces in his native France. Another recent work: The artist changed a red Fiat into a street food car. Find more of his creations below.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Diana Al-Hadid’s ghostly sculptures, which take influence from historical architecture, mythology, and beyond, are currently inhabiting both a gallery at Frist Art Museum and outdoor gardens at Cheekwood in concurrent exhibitions in Nashville. “Subliminations” collects varying types of work from the artist, with both figurative sculpture and wall reliefs. Above and below interior photos are by John Schweikert.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At the Takeo Onsen hot springs in Japan, teamLab’s immersive, massive installation has returned to the historic Mifuneyama Rakuen Park, now adding a daytime component to “A Forest Where Gods Live.” The teamLab exhibition differs from similar immersive efforts such as Meow Wolf and Onedome in that it uses an expansive outdoor space while paying homage to its history—as well as interactive elements.(teamLab was last featured here.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

In his first exhibition in Hungary, Dmitry Kawarga’s “post-human” sculptures and installations reflect on humanity’s vulnerability. His “Anthropocentrism Toxicosis” series, in particular, is on display at the Ferenczy Museum, with works built with polymers and occasionally, usage of 3D-printing processes. The exhibition runs through Sept. 15.