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Aleksandar Todorovic Paints ‘Religion Remastered’

Taking influence from Byzantine art and other eras of religious art, Aleksandar Todorovic renders contemporary tech figures as religious icons and social media symbols as sacred, in egg tempera and acrylic. Elsewhere, his painted and sculpture works look at consumerism and contemporary global politics. He recently displayed this works under the title “Religion Remastered.”

Taking influence from Byzantine art and other eras of religious art, Aleksandar Todorovic renders contemporary tech figures as religious icons and social media symbols as sacred, in egg tempera and acrylic. Elsewhere, his painted and sculpture works look at consumerism and contemporary global politics. He recently displayed this works under the title “Religion Remastered.”

“This remaster, by changing its content, has expunged the sacral core present in any religion,” the artist says. “What is being offered however is a clearer look into the essence – and complexity – of the problems we are facing today. It is also a kind of warning, that our urge to believe can be diverted towards ideas and things which are not only unnecessary, but are downright harmful to us.”

See more of his works below and find him on the web here.

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