by Andy SmithPosted on

In Amy Brener’s “Omni-Kit” sculpture series, everyday objects and imagery are reprocessed into totem-like sculptures that speak to ritual and memory. These works are highlighted in a new show at Jack Barrett Gallery titled “Consolarium,” a word the artist created for the place where these objects and figures across time collide into these single objects. Materials include urethane resin and foam, silicone, pigment, and more. The show runs through Dec. 20.

by Andy SmithPosted on

CrocodilePOWER is a Moscow-based duo who craft dystopic yet vibrant installations, sculptures, and paintings. Consisting of artists Peter Goloshchapov and Oksana Simatova, the pair works in materials like fiberglass, porcelain, wood, moss, iron, and more. See some of their recent, startling visions below.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Max Hooper Schneider’s lush sculptures and installations, his experiences in marine biology and landscape architecture prove to be ever-present influences. His Hammer Projects exhibition at Hammer Museum in Los Angeles is immersive and packed with too many details for one viewing, packed with found objects amassed over several years. The exhibition runs through Feb. 2 at the museum.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Through the manipulation of 17 people, La Machine unleashed a dragon on Calais, France, with its latest, towering creation and performance. “Le Dragon de Calais” was unveiled earlier this month by the French group of artists, which was last featured on HiFructose.com here. Previously, they crafted a 60-foot mechanical spider, 50-foot-tall Minotaur, and other creatures ripped from myth for their performances.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Francesco Barocco’s sculptures reconsider art history through conflicting modes, pairing elegant 2-dimensional forms with malformed sculptural material that would have once held the subject’s likeness. The effect is both striking and eeries, as the ancient figures appear contemplative in some works, and in agony in others.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Stephanie H. Shih’s ceramic sculptures reflect on her upbringing as a first-generation Asian-American through “the lens of the Asian-American pantry.” The output ranges from hundreds and hundreds of porcelain dumplings to certain imported sauces and oils. With her work, she’s also raised funds for communities across the U.S., from displaces indigenous tribes to hurricane victims.