by Andy SmithPosted on

Paola Idrontino‘s massive textile sculpture “Evanescent” depicts the scourge of coral bleaching in the world’s oceans, brought on by climate change. The work, which took years to complete, was recently on display at Museu del Disseny de Barcelona. Idrontino’s practice includes textiles, wearable art, and photography.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The lifesized crocheted and knitted figures made by Finland artist Liisa Hietanen are based off of people in her hometown. The artist gets to know them during the process of creating their likeness. When the artist is done with one of her “Villager” sculptures, she takes it to the public and displays them in Hämeenkyrö.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Marc Sijan‘s hyperrealistic figurative sculptures are both unsettling and vulnerable. The artist often depicts everyday people, from blue-collar workers and public servants to characters in their most vulnerable moments. And at times, works like “Birth” take on a more conceptual role.

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Guy Laramée sculpts and “erodes” books into mountain landscapes. The artist says “the erosion of culture” is an ongoing theme in his sculptural work and paintings. The artist has been active for three decades, with several other disciplines in tow that include live music, theatre, and literature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Raija Jokinen reassembles aspects of the human bodies with flax. The Finnish artist interweaves creatures and notes of nature into her recreations of our interior. Jokinen considers her work to exist at the “meeting point of the techniques in painting, graphic art, hand made paper and textile.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Salman Khoshroo builds figures out of electric wire, with the resulting character being made for both close inspection and movement. His reflections show the ties between the human machine and the manmade machine. And his kinetic sculptures, in particular, tell of the inherent ability for motion in both of these.