by Andy SmithPosted on

The disturbing, seemingly organic forms created by Mireia Donat Melús take on an interactive edge with works like “Trou,” an installation that invites the viewer’s hand into the work and shows its exploration using an interior camera. His sculptures, made from nylon and empty silicone fiber, appear to be both human-grown and alien in nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Utilizing the traditional method of woodcarving of “Ichibokuzukuri,” using a single block of wood for sculptures, Koji Tanada crafts both enigmatic and elegant figures. In a show running at Mizuma Art Gallery, “Unclothed and Clothed,” the artist’s latest figures and busts are displayed. Between each work, the women crafted by the artist exhibit power, grace, and vulnerability.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Debbie Lawson’s ghostly rug sculptures, animal heads emerge from domestic patterns. In some pieces, flora and fauna extend from the unlikely objects. Yet, in her full body representations of bears, the work is at its most powerful and captivating. The intricate patterns of the fabrics add to the contours of the beasts.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Kristen Egan‘s work, packed with notes of mythology and folk art, is featured in a new show at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia. “Still Coming Ashore” features the whimsical sculptures of the artist, who also co-owns the archery gear/fine arts business Egan & Ives.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Jason Hackenwerth’s enormous, inflatable sculptures emulate organic forms, writhing and towering over passers-by on streets across the globe. His “Animal Soul” series, in particular, features vibrant creatures created from latex balloons. He recently showed this wearable works in an exhibition exhibition at Brookfield Place in New York City. Like much of his work, it was a temporary affair.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At Burlington City Arts, Crystal Wagner‘s first-ever work existing in both the interior and exterior of a space comes with “Traverse.” Wagner is known for biomorphic creations that span sculpture, prints, and installations. This exhibition, running through Oct. 2, features a site-specific installation that “grows from floor to ceiling and emerges outside to meander across the exterior façade.” Wagner was last featured on HiFructose.com here.