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Kati Heck Debuts New Paintings, Sculptures in ‘All my friends are wild’

Kati Heck's wild paintings, sculptures, textile work, and photographs are featured in a new show at Tim Van Laere Gallery. "All my friends are wild" takes influence from philosopher Donna Haraway, who often explores concepts at the intersection of science and feminism. The show, running through July 6 in the massive space in Antwerp, collects both small and enormous works. Heck was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Kati Heck’s wild paintings, sculptures, textile work, and photographs are featured in a new show at Tim Van Laere Gallery. “All my friends are wild” takes influence from philosopher Donna Haraway, who often explores concepts at the intersection of science and feminism. The show, running through July 6 in the massive space in Antwerp, collects both small and enormous works. Heck was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

“Kati Heck’s masterful virtuosity is unmistakable,” the gallery says. “She portrays her figures in a photo-realistic manner with great attention to every detail. She combines that precision with abstractions and parts that are applied almost sculpturally on canvas. Most of her subjects are derived from her immediate surroundings, making most her works populated by her friends, neighbors and pets. Her works reminds us of the bars, dancers and actors of Otto Dix and George Grosz, but also refer to Jean-Michael Basquiat and the Old Masters. With her works, Heck synthesizes different styles, combining elements from expressionism and surrealism with social realism.”

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