Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Diana Al-Hadid’s Work Haunts Indoor, Outdoor Spaces in Nashville

Diana Al-Hadid’s ghostly sculptures, which take influence from historical architecture, mythology, and beyond, are currently inhabiting both a gallery at Frist Art Museum and outdoor gardens at Cheekwood in concurrent exhibitions in Nashville. “Subliminations” collects varying types of work from the artist, with both figurative sculpture and wall reliefs. Above and below interior photos are by John Schweikert.

Diana Al-Hadid’s ghostly sculptures, which take influence from historical architecture, mythology, and beyond, are currently inhabiting both a gallery at Frist Art Museum and outdoor gardens at Cheekwood in concurrent exhibitions in Nashville. “Subliminations” collects varying types of work from the artist, with both figurative sculpture and wall reliefs. Above and below interior photos are by John Schweikert.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bz3HfnbjhKI/

“nfluenced by a wide range of sources, including art, history, and literature of both Western and Eastern traditions, Islamic calligraphy, ancient architecture, and cartography, Al-Hadid creates impressionistic meditations on ruination and renewal,” the museum says. “Many of Al-Hadid’s sculptures appear suspended in a state of construction or collapse.”

Find Al-Hadid on the web here, and read more about her exhibitions on Frist Art Museum’s site. See more of Al-Hadid’s work outside of these exhibitions below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Rio de Janeiro native Ernesto Neto is often quoted as saying, “I am sculpture and think as sculpture.” Neto’s been exhibiting internationally since the 1990s, and the artist’s latest biomorphic work is a natural evolution of that oft-cited quote, tailored to the spaces each piece inhabits. From a distance, these new, vibrant installations appear as though they grew inside these walls organically. But Neto’s work isn’t meant to be enjoyed from afar.
Using painted resin, wood, and metal, New York-based artist Jiannan Wu’s recent relief sculptures feature scenes ripped from urban environments. The artist often plays with perspective whether it’s his distorted “Selfie” series or a visit to the city’s subway backdrops. A statement says that Wu is always considering multiple dimensions in his work.
Nathan French, a fashion designer-turned-fine artist, crafts captivating and unsettling sculptures crystals, feathers, wax, and other unexpected materials. The artist, who appears in the upcoming Park Park Studios group show "Wasteland,” had previously created wearable art in his previous career. And in fine art, threads from that training endure.
"I am inspired by the incredible variety and complexity of the natural world that surrounds me," says Southern France based artist Rogan Brown. Brown's winter wonderland of intricately cut paper sculptures first caught our attention in 2013, when we featured his abstract formations of florals and pathogens, hand-cut out of watercolor paper with exquisite precision. His latest series, created throughout 2015, combines the techniques of hand paper cutting and laser cutting, leaving the burnt edges of the paper for added texture and depth to his already complex works of art.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List