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Exhibition Surveys Work of Sculptor Rina Banerjee

Rina Banerjee, known for dazzling sculptures crafted from material sourced around the globe, has her first mid-career retrospective in an exhibition at San Jose Museum of Art, kicking off this month. “Make Me a Summary of the World” begins on May 16 and runs through Oct. 6 at the space. The exhibitions is curated by the museum staffer Lauren Schell Dickens and Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts curator of contemporary art Jodi Throckmorton.

Rina Banerjee, known for dazzling sculptures crafted from material sourced around the globe, has her first mid-career retrospective in an exhibition at San Jose Museum of Art, kicking off this month. “Make Me a Summary of the World” begins on May 16 and runs through Oct. 6 at the space. The exhibitions is curated by the museum staffer Lauren Schell Dickens and Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts curator of contemporary art Jodi Throckmorton.

“Banerjee … is one of the most important artists of the post-colonial Indian diaspora living in the United States and her work has been shown most extensively in Europe and South Asia,” the museum says. “This exhibition, the first in-depth examination into the artist’s work, will consider Banerjee in both American and global frameworks, specifically in relation to Banerjee’s approach to feminism, globalism, colonialism and the environment.”

See more from the exhibition below.

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