by Andy SmithPosted on

In Alexandra Kehayoglou’s functional wool rugs are landscapes and waterways of her native Argentina. Often her works are tethered to news stories in these regions, describing areas transformed by manmade, destructive behavior. These massive pieces offer both aerial views and classical depictions of real-life representations of the natural world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sophia Narrett’s painterly approach to embroidery results in elaborate, startling scenes. Her themes traverse escapism, psychology, and sexuality. Each section of the work brings its own surprising sharpness, with a certain visceral quality resulting from the material.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The embroidered monsters of Tracy Widdess add an unexpected texture to the horror genre. The Vancouver artist has called her practice “brutal knitting.” And with her talents in crafting textile fright, she embodies that label with both wearable and standalone pieces.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jannick Deslauriers uses textiles to create ghostly, massive sculptures. Whether it’s a time-worn car or a cityscape, her works appear as structures that can be passed through. She uses darker threads as her “pencil outlines,” blending textures and techniques to create pieces that resemble little else.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nora Fok’s blend of textile and jewelry art results in otherworldly pieces, implementing a variety of materials and processes for statements that resemble little else in wearable fashion. Despite their progressive, sometimes futuristic look, the pieces often implement age-old approaches: braiding, weaving, and knitting are used to string together hundreds of elements like nylon monofilament and beads.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Turkish-American designer Eda Yorulmazoğlu crafts wild costumes, with both distinct body of works and individual creatures as part of her repertoire. Part-fashion designer, part-textile artist, she navigates several spheres, all carrying an absurdism and vibrancy bolstered by bringing them out into the public.