by Andy SmithPosted on

Vanessa Barragão’s textile art emulates the forms and ecosystems of the ocean. In contrast to the ceramic works of artists like Courtney Mattison, who also explore life in the water, the artist’s material adds a different, flowing texture to these scenes. The yarns are upcycled and the techniques artisanal, as the artist acknowledges the polluting affects of the textile industry.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Threadstories is an artist based in Ireland who crafts both engrossing and humorous textile masks. The wearable works take on new characteristics in motion, which she displays on the Threadstories Instagram account.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The strange textile sculptures of Etc. and the Madness subvert humanity in their writhing forms. For some, the creatures may resemble the pop culture-Internet-born villain Slenderman. But Etc.’s characters are decidedly less sinister, and are more disconcerting in how their casual, slumped existences.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Magnhild Kennedy, the Norwegian artist also known as Damselfrau, crafts intricate masks that mix fine art and fashion. She makes these pieces with both textiles and found objects. In a statement, the artist offers her own explanation of this approach:

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Alexandra Kehayoglou’s functional wool rugs are landscapes and waterways of her native Argentina. Often her works are tethered to news stories in these regions, describing areas transformed by manmade, destructive behavior. These massive pieces offer both aerial views and classical depictions of real-life representations of the natural world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sophia Narrett’s painterly approach to embroidery results in elaborate, startling scenes. Her themes traverse escapism, psychology, and sexuality. Each section of the work brings its own surprising sharpness, with a certain visceral quality resulting from the material.