by Andy SmithPosted on

Oleg Dou’s photo manipulations subvert the elegance of classical still-life or mutate the subjects of his quiet portraits. The award-winning artist, hailing from Russia, has shown these creations in shows across the globe. Recent work takes the everyday table settings of the Renaissance and stirs sexualized conversations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Recycling packaging materials and other discardables, photographer Suzanne Jongmans crafts Renaissance-style portraits that examine contemporary consumption. The artist finds value in these otherwise overlooked materials; elsewhere, she piles clothes and finds beauty in unfinished garments.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In constructing her photographs, Jennifer Thoreson creates abstract objects and a curated space for her models to dwell. The result are works that are at once intimate and surreal, her crafted amorphous accessories extensions of the figures’ humanity. In the series “Testament,” the artist subverts everyday scenes with something darker and revealing.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Niko Photographisme‘s “The Robot Next Door” series, the artist depicts a world in which robotic creatures are among us. Blending analog materials with a bit of digital manipulation to create a surreal final product, the artist is able to create an intimate view of a sci-fi scenario. Depicting the figures taking part in everyday activities, the pieces carry a surprising vulnerability to match the futuristic concept.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Christy Lee Rogers stages her work underwater, alluding to the vibrancy and elaborate elegance of the Baroque period. Her “Hybrids” series, in particular, blends the beauty of submerged human form, plantlife, and textiles. The artist has said that her work questions and finds “understanding in the craziness, tragedy, vulnerability, beauty and power of mankind.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Pelle Cass’s composite photographs use time-lapse techniques to create chaotic sporting events. The artist has said that part of the fun in creating each work is being able to subvert the typical athletic affair and put the crowds in the fields, not in the stands. The artist doesn’t alter any of the settings in the work; he only takes out and adds in figures.