by Andy SmithPosted on

San Francisco-raised artist Kat Toronto blends performance art and photography under the working name of Miss Meatface, using both vintage Polaroid and contemporary methods. The artist says part of her work stems in having been diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2010 and subsequently having to receive a full hysterectomy. Toronto now uses her moniker “as an artistic and spiritual catalyst to delve into a complex set of questions about where she fits into society as a woman.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Anthony Hurd’s vibrant, chaotic landscapes carry the complexity of our emotional states. They are at once elegant and arrested, inviting and dangerous. Overall, it may seem like a more abstract direction for the artist, yet in another sense, it’s explorations are wholly human. Hurd says several life events are in the make-up of this work: the loss of a sibling, the end of a relationship, mental hardship, and several other factors play into these paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ulla-Stina Wikander, an artist living in Stockholm, creates cross-stitched sculptures using domestic and everyday objects as her base. Wikander isn’t dissuaded by the complex edges and surfaces of machinery and furniture: Each piece becomes a surreal, yet familiar art object when embroidered by the artist. Depending on the project, time spent on each work can vary wildly.

by Andy SmithPosted on

London artist Alex Gamsu Jenkins crafts vibrant, satirical illustrations that play on several aspects of the Western experience. His absurd scenes often dismantle and manipulate the human body, with both bleak and humorous results. Much of the artist’s recent work, in particular, seems to tackle our reliance on technology and its eventual implications.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lars Calmar’s figures, often bare and grotesque, carry a humanity that feels at once humorous and sincerely tortured. Even when using animals alongside his baby-like creatures and hulking brutes, the ceramic works feel as wholly human, though primal, in emotion. The artist’s sculptures have been shown in galleries and museums across the world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Emily Blythe Jones combines painting and sculpture in a way that feels both universally nostalgic and intimate. The Los Angeles-based artist crafts portraits, with 2D and 3D peeks into the past “inspired by an inherited family archive of photographs, oral histories and other ephemera from her Midwestern background.”