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The Kinetic Sculptures of Casey Curran

Casey Curran's kinetic sculptures consist of wire, aluminum, motors, sculpted brass, cranks, or other materials, yet resemble organic objects in essence. The artist, hailing from Washington, crafts his intricate works with the cycles and shapes of nature in mind, yet each sculpture doesn’t seem to draw from any one creature or floral element.

Casey Curran‘s kinetic sculptures consist of wire, aluminum, motors, sculpted brass, cranks, or other materials, yet resemble organic objects in essence. The artist, hailing from Washington, crafts his intricate works with the cycles and shapes of nature in mind, yet each sculpture doesn’t seem to draw from any one creature or floral element.

“I invite the viewer to become a part of the work through participation, animating a tableau of flora and fauna that bloom or flutter to life when activated,” the artist says. “When conceiving my pieces I center on a hidden narrative and begin to assign visual elements that align with the concept of the piece, often utilizing ornate structures and simple construction methods to further highlight my interests in foundation and form. In the process of creating I look for patterns in nature and symmetry in ecosystems. I look for how innovation shapes itself into our ever expanding systems of complexity and knowledge.”

See more of Curran’s work below.

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