by Andy SmithPosted on

David Fullarton balances striking figurative drawing with humorous and conceptual text work, with recent work that leans wholly in either direction. His recent plates, in particular, show his knack for the deceptively simple. Fullarton was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lulu Lin’s drawings subvert the human form in surprising and engrossing ways, whether in her editorial illustrations or personal work. In recent work for MAYDAY magazine, Migrant Journal, and other publications, these cascading faces fill the page and offer a tension in both repelling and garnering fixation.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Yuko Shimizu’s illustrations continue to captivate, whether they adorn books, magazine stories, comic book coveries, or gallery walls. The New York City-based, Japan-born artist is known for a diverse client list, from NIKE and The New York Times to Library of Congress. As usual, Shimizu shares thorough process documentation online, showing how she crafts her professional and personal work on a granular level.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Anna Park’s charcoal drawings are kinetic and absorbing, each scene embedded in crowd activity. The action seems to move between revelry and violence, the faces of her subjects distorted and disappearing. The artist also integrates varying sensibilities into these works and moves between cartoonish and realistic rendering.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the recent illustrations of Elif Varol Ergen, the artist dives further into the mystical with her feminine heroes and creatures, her own myths and contemporary lessons emerging. Since she was last featured on HiFructose.com (here), she released her first print publication, “A Sequence of Witches,” through Von Zos. The artist was also featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 19.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matt Furie, the artist and illustrator known for crafting (and killing) the frog character Pepe, brings his humorous and vibrant sensibilities to Nucleus Portland in a show currently running at the gallery. “Tuff Crowd” offers both crowd scenes and single portraits, all packed with Furie characters.