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The Ink Drawings of Nina Bunjevac

Nina Bunjevac’s masterful stippled drawings have appeared as single works, portraiture, comic books, tarot cards, commercial illustration, and other forms. All showcase the Canada-born artist’s command of shadows and subtlety, with the ability to move between the macabre and the humorous within a single frame. Earlier this year, she released her latest graphic novel, "Bezimena," a re-imagining of the myth of Artemis and Siproites.

Nina Bunjevac’s masterful stippled drawings have appeared as single works, portraiture, comic books, tarot cards, commercial illustration, and other forms. All showcase the Canada-born artist’s command of shadows and subtlety, with the ability to move between the macabre and the humorous within a single frame. Earlier this year, she released her latest graphic novel, “Bezimena,” a re-imagining of the myth of Artemis and Siproites.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B2ZZDC2BFvx/

“Drawing on her own traumatic memories of sexual assault, Ninja Bunjevac explores the warped psyche of a sexual predator,” the publisher says of the book. “Told through a noirish lens, Bezimena is the story of a man who develops a disturbing sexual obsession with a former classmate, steadily losing his grasp on reality. As his fantasies become increasingly lurid, the book’s imagery grows ever more surreal; in her masterfully lush, stippled technique, Bunjevac conjures mesmerizing dreamscapes and eerie allusions to the Greek myth of Artemis and Siproites.”

See more of her work on her site.




https://www.instagram.com/p/B2Dei5wBgbg/

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