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The Surreal Drawings of Kyle Cobban

Kyle Cobban has said that the sensibility of his surreal drawings are rooted in his career as an instructor, observing students exploring their own stories. Recent work, in particular, seems to be examining the relationship between his subjects and the concept of "home." His drawings on Priority Mail envelopes further underscore this concept.

Kyle Cobban has said that the sensibility of his surreal drawings are rooted in his career as an instructor, observing students exploring their own stories. Recent work, in particular, seems to be examining the relationship between his subjects and the concept of “home.” His drawings on Priority Mail envelopes further underscore this concept.



“Cobban creates surreal images that evoke both the strength and vulnerability essential for inner metamorphosis,” Line Dot says. “Prioritizing line and tonal qualities, his realistically-rendered characters are contrasted with the emptiness of their white backgrounds. The juxtaposition of these static environments with more rhythmic features results in a subdued sense of movement within the works. These lovely graphite drawings on paper are exquisitely rendered, full of nuance and depth.”

See more of Cobban’s work on his site.

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