by Andy SmithPosted on

Mikiko Kumazawa’s hand brings both richness and chaos touch to contemporary life. Whether in pencil drawings or visceral sculptures, the Tokyo-based artist depicts worlds that are just connected enough to our realities to inspire anxiety. Kumazawa was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ceren Aksungur, also known as Dolce Paganne, is an Antwerp-based artist who crafts surreal, unsettling drawings and paintings. Her work combines both the strange and the mundane, subverting the everyday. Works such as “Pomegrenade,” implement both acrylics and colored pencil on paper.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Artist Brett Crawford looks at his pieces as collaborations between the work and the viewer, each an inviting narrative. His new show at 111 Minna Gallery, “Caravan,” features paintings that blend pop culture, mythology, and otherwise odd moments. The show kicks off on July 6.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Karine Rougier’s mystical “Wild waves in our hands” touches both on our tribal nature and explores femininity. The show is staged at Catinca Tabacaru Gallery in New York City throughout the month. On the show, the gallery says this: “Women are Rougier’s muses; poetry her nourishment: an ode to Ingeborg Bachmann, Rainer Maria Rilke, les Métamorphoses d’Ovide.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Seungyea Park, also known as Spunky Zoe, crafts cerebral, stirring drawings that reflect varying internal tensions. Subjects, sometimes including the artist, do more than push, pull, and prod their faces: Their fingers pass through their skin and subvert its properties, conveying a spectrum of emotions.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The vulnerable, fantastical oil paintings of Scott G. Brooks offer both narratives and raw portraiture. Though the artist has a knack for large-scale, intricate scenes, he can pack immense power in his single-character works. Brooks was last featured on our website here. In a statement, the artist talks about where his paintings come from.