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The Drawn Cityscapes of Benjamin Sack

Benjamin Sack draws imaginary cityscapes that recall historical metropolitans and motifs that have graced the Earth for millennia. His hyperdetailed approach not only shows a command of varying structural textures but also a power over perspective. (Sack was last featured on HiFructose.com here.)

Benjamin Sack draws imaginary cityscapes that recall historical metropolitans and motifs that have graced the Earth for millennia. His hyperdetailed approach not only shows a command of varying structural textures but also a power over perspective. (Sack was last featured on HiFructose.com here.)

Of their current exhibition of his work, the Direktorenhaus in Berlin calls his it a “collection of map-like meditations surveying unfamiliar forms of urbanism; depictions of infinite expanses playing upon themes paradoxical and perpetual. At the root of the drawings are a familiar family of symbols — stars, spirals, cubes and circles— referencing cartographical, cosmological literary and musical inspirations. The compositions are formed from clusters of varying architectural histories, orchestrated in a mosaic fashion to create new and unchartered perspectives.”

Find more on the venue’s site and Sack’s own page.

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