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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Jeff Soto’s New Mural and Public Art Installation in France

Jeff Soto's (HF Vol. 16 cover artist) enigmatic creations contain both friendly creatures and personifications of the forces of the Earth, balancing a sense of innocence with the suggestion of a deeper power below the surface. The otherworldly characters skip spryly through his canvases and murals, their bodies and limbs composed of bubbling mud, mighty tree trunks and light tufts of moss. The artist recently traveled to Bordeaux, France for a public art project for the Fête le Vin 2014. The Bernard Magrez Cultural Institute invited Soto as a special guest in partnership with Spacejunk, an urban art gallery with locations all over France. While he was in the area, Soto painted a large wall at Darwin, an interdisciplinary cultural center and co-working space focused on sustainability.

Jeff Soto’s (HF Vol. 16 cover artist) enigmatic creations contain both friendly creatures and personifications of the forces of the Earth, balancing a sense of innocence with the suggestion of a deeper power below the surface. The otherworldly characters skip spryly through his canvases and murals, their bodies and limbs composed of bubbling mud, mighty tree trunks and light tufts of moss. The artist recently traveled to Bordeaux, France for a public art project for the Fête le Vin 2014. The Bernard Magrez Cultural Institute invited Soto as a special guest in partnership with Spacejunk, an urban art gallery with locations all over France. While he was in the area, Soto painted a large wall at Darwin, an interdisciplinary cultural center and co-working space focused on sustainability.

Photos courtesy of Spacejunk.

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