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Studio KCA Uses Tons of Plastic Waste to Construct ‘Skyscraper’ Whale

Studio KCA used 5 tons of plastic waste pulled from the Pacific Ocean to construct a 4-story-tall whale, part of the 2018 Bruges Triennial. Dubbed "Skyscraper," the work is "a reminder of the 150,000,000 tons of plastic waste still swimming in our waters." Studio KCA worked with the Hawaii Wildlife Fund and the Surfrider Foundation Kaui Chapter to collect the waste used.

Studio KCA used 5 tons of plastic waste pulled from the Pacific Ocean to construct a 4-story-tall whale, part of the 2018 Bruges Triennial. Dubbed “Skyscraper,” the work is “a reminder of the 150,000,000 tons of plastic waste still swimming in our waters.” Studio KCA worked with the Hawaii Wildlife Fund and the Surfrider Foundation Kaui Chapter to collect the waste used.

“The organizers … approached us to create an artpiece interpreting the idea of the ‘liquid city,’ a concept that defines the city as an ever changing set of consumer transactions, whose identity is in flux as cities grow more and more connected through globalization,” the group says. “Our first thought led us to thinking about the biggest liquid city on the planet (the ocean), how it connects us all, and how the waste produced and consumed in our cities, specifically plastic waste, ends up in the ocean.”

See more shots of the work below.


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