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The Sculpted Creatures of Masayoshi Hanawa

Masayoshi Hanawa’s intricate ceramic and resin creatures are pulled from the artist’s internal mythology. His creations are filled with mosaic-like detail, each corner of a monster a meticulously crafted and vibrant pattern.

Masayoshi Hanawa’s intricate ceramic and resin creatures are pulled from the artist’s internal mythology. His creations are filled with mosaic-like detail, each corner of a monster a meticulously crafted and vibrant pattern.



“When he was child, (he) lived with his mother in a very isolated house in the woods. His mother worked at night,” writes Atsuko Barouh. “To keep his fears at bay, he drew monsters who protected him. As an adult, he continues to draw these creatures, favoring work on a soft cotton fabric that can be folded and carried around everywhere. For a few years, he has been working in a factory making frying pans. This work, transforming metal, fascinates him.”

See more on the artist’s site.




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