Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Raija Jokinen’s Intricate Textile Figures

Raija Jokinen reassembles aspects of the human bodies with flax. The Finnish artist interweaves creatures and notes of nature into her recreations of our interior. Jokinen considers her work to exist at the "meeting point of the techniques in painting, graphic art, hand made paper and textile."

Raija Jokinen reassembles aspects of the human bodies with flax. The Finnish artist interweaves creatures and notes of nature into her recreations of our interior. Jokinen considers her work to exist at the “meeting point of the techniques in painting, graphic art, hand made paper and textile.”

“With my artworks I am searching the interface of spirit and materials: Do we know precisely what is the physical and what is spiritual?” the artist says. “Visually my works are based on physical human body and body parts, but the details don’t follow anatomy or physiology of the real body but offers unexpected variants. In my works a human body represents more the soul and feelings instead of the physical substance. As materials for my works, I started to use paper yarns and proceeded to hand made paper made of flax among others. I proceed to use flax without the traditional papermaking techniques and researched the various other ways to treat it.”

See more of her work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Sun-Hyuk Kim’s sculptures may resemble manipulated tree limbs, yet the artist's work is in welding and cutting metal wires and pipes. The result are ethereal figures that impress on any scale. The South Korean's startling creations have appeared in gallery and museum shows across the globe.
David Jien’s works on paper and sculptures blend modern pop culture and video games with historical iconography and imagery. These hyperdetailed works can feel both mythological and like a Nintendo RPG. The Los Angeles-based artist uses colored pencil and graphite on his paper works, along with occasional use of holographic film and other elements that add to their otherworldly nature.
In what he calls “hyperbaroque” sculptures, Miguel Rodrigues twists and poses plastic resin into forms that resemble both metal and fabric. Specifically, the artist uses PETg (or polyethylene terephthalate), and is able to craft works from the material that inspire on both tabletops and as massive structures.
Minneapolis-based artist and designer John Foster makes sparkling glass objects that look well-suited for the homes of fairies and mermaids. Interested in the geometric structures that govern various natural phenomena, Foster creates iridescent prisms that, when grouped together, cast brilliant reflections in the surrounding space. The artist works in a variety of media, including sculpture, painting, and installation, and seeks to use geometry as a way to change the ways viewers interact with the spaces around them.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List