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Yoshitoshi Kanemaki’s Recent, Reality-Bending Figurative Sculptures

The sculptures of Yoshitoshi Kanemaki bend and distort the human form. Often using the repetition of facial features as a means to explore the endless emotions contained within a subject, his use of wood adds a complexity to both the texture of his figures and the skill required. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 38 and he last appeared on HiFructose.com here.


The sculptures of Yoshitoshi Kanemaki bend and distort the human form. Often using the repetition of facial features as a means to explore the endless emotions contained within a subject, his use of wood adds a complexity to both the texture of his figures and the skill required. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 38 and he last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

“(Every day), all kinds of the good or bad communications we’re faced with produce many question marks in my mind,” he said, in a translated interview with Elsa Art Gallery in TaiPei. “And I gain inspiration from them. These notions don’t take shape from the start, but instead brew with specificity in the mind until the inspiration for sculpting ripens. My work, to sum it all up, is the process of transferring the question marks in my mind to the shapes in these sculptures.”

See more of the artist’s recent works below.

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