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Nicholas Crombach’s Sculptures Explore Human, Animal Ties

Whether rendered life-sized in resin and paint or smaller and 3D-printed, Nicholas Crombach’s figures explore our ties to the creatures of the natural world. The Canadian-born artist uses 3D printing as an extension of his past work and purpose, in a time when the contemporary tool is often used to create novelty items and irreverent, one-note sculptures. Services like Shapify have made the reaction of the human body a superficial process, while Crombach tackles something much older in nature.

Whether rendered life-sized in resin and paint or smaller and 3D-printed, Nicholas Crombach’s figures explore our ties to the creatures of the natural world. The Canadian-born artist uses 3D printing as an extension of his past work and purpose, in a time when the contemporary tool is often used to create novelty items and irreverent, one-note sculptures. Services like Shapify have made the reaction of the human body a superficial process, while Crombach tackles something much older in nature.


In a statement, the artist explains his broader charge: “The human to animal relationship, riddled with political, social, moral and ethical complications, acts as a leading catalyst to my practice. My work wrestles with the plight of humans as unique conscious beings with the capacity for reason. I am preoccupied with the mental state of being caught between conflicting positions resulting in an exploration that percolates around notions of innocence, shame and the simultaneous desire of opposing standpoints.”

See more of his works below.

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