Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The New Mythological Worlds of Jesse Jacobi

Jesse Jacobi's expansive, seemingly ancient worlds reflect on the cycles of life and nature in a new show at Arch Enemy Arts. "From The Eternal Green Mouth" collects new acrylic paintings from the Michigan artist, who was last featured on HiFructose.com here. His new show opens on July 12 at the Philadelphia venue. The gallery says these works “operate in broad, open-ended symbolism as opposed to a straight narrative, to be looked at from different angles, dependent on the viewer—psychologically, emotionally, mythologically, even ecologically.”

Jesse Jacobi’s expansive, seemingly ancient worlds reflect on the cycles of life and nature in a new show at Arch Enemy Arts. “From The Eternal Green Mouth” collects new acrylic paintings from the Michigan artist, who was last featured on HiFructose.com here. His new show opens on July 12 at the Philadelphia venue. The gallery says these works “operate in broad, open-ended symbolism as opposed to a straight narrative, to be looked at from different angles, dependent on the viewer—psychologically, emotionally, mythologically, even ecologically.”

“The fundamental principle behind this group of paintings is the very simple idea that light and darkness define each other – a concept as old as human awareness,” Jacobi says. “I hope this group of paintings reflects these feelings that we all know, which are deeply embedded in all of us.”

See more of Jacobi’s work here and read more about the gallery here.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
American artists — from the painters of the Hudson River School to the influential Andrew Wyeth — have long depicted this country’s vast landscape as simultaneously a place of lonely desolation and of awe-inspiring grandeur. Following in this tradition, Andrea Kowch creates gorgeous and eerie acrylic paintings of open-skied pastoral landscapes. Inspired by a deep fascination with the natural world, Kowch’s works also tap into a common feeling of uneasiness many of us have toward the American rural – a place that is iconic for its beauty but that is also often associated with tedium, isolation and a clinging to negative aspects of the country's past.
theory_of_strings Polish artist Jacek Yerka's paintings invite us into a world where things are not what they seem. Caves turn into gaping dragons' mouths, houses float above the clouds, and gardens become seemingly infinite puzzles of time and space. The artist blurs the boundaries between the biological and the mechanical, creating strange hybrids of animals, architecture, and geological formations. Yerka began his career making band posters in the 1970s and has been exhibiting his work in Poland for decades.
Tunisian artist Atef Maatallah paints people on grainy, monotone backgrounds to highlight the inner worlds of his characters. Maatallah often paints diptychs, in which one panel features only a single object such as a tea pot or small animal. Purposely separated from the human figures, the objects serve as outer manifestations of the peoples' fears or desires. For example, an elderly woman with sun-baked sunken cheeks watches with a solemn expression as the feathers of a skinned bird — its' complexion the same color as the woman's — float downwards. In another image, a forlorn mother looks down as her two children sleep; one in her arms, the other slouched against her back. In the background, a bare light bulb hangs. The light is out.
Toronto painter Sarah Cannon creates vulnerable, yet startling paintings of female subjects, often set against and inside natural backdrops. The artist’s vivid hues and linework are often rendered in oils. Below, however, the artist also experiments with digital methods with the “Fish Tank” work.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List