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Lucy Glendinning’s Figures Carry Surprising Textures

Lucy Glendinning’s figures carry absorbing, yet unsettling textures alien to the human body. The artist uses material like wax, duck feathers, timber, jesmonite, glass, and other materials for her strange, often fetal-positioned characters. For some, Glendinning's work may recall the feather-based sculptures of Kate MccGwire, last featured on HiFructose.com here. A past statement offers some insight on Glendinning’s vision.

Lucy Glendinning’s figures carry absorbing, yet unsettling textures alien to the human body. The artist uses material like wax, duck feathers, timber, jesmonite, glass, and other materials for her strange, often fetal-positioned characters. For some, Glendinning’s work may recall the feather-based sculptures of Kate MccGwire, last featured on HiFructose.com here. A past statement offers some insight on Glendinning’s vision.

“Here, different aesthetic expressions are brought together under one central entry point: the human body as a semiotic medium,” a statement says. “For Glendinning, art is the primary tool for investigating psychological and philosophical themes. Her work is thus permeated by a conceptual content, superior to the value of aesthetics. That does not imply that the artistic performance is lacking, on the contrary, she is seducing the observing eye by emphasizing subtle expressions and presenting a stunning craftsmanship.”


Glendinning works and lives in Somerset, England. Her work has been shown in Paris, the U.S., France, Sweden, and beyond. See more of the the artist’s work below.

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