Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Kate MccGwire’s Writhing, Absorbing Feather Sculptures Remix the Natural World

Kate MccGwire’s anthropomorphic pieces exude a naturally sourced beauty as they writhe and loom in place. Much of her sculptural and installation work uses materials from the animal world, like pheasant and crow feathers, to create something new entirely. The British sculptor uses a dozen verbs to describe what she does: "I gather, collate, re-use, layer, peel, burn, reveal, locate, question, duplicate, play and photograph."

Kate MccGwire’s anthropomorphic pieces exude a naturally sourced beauty as they writhe and loom in place. Much of her sculptural and installation work uses materials from the animal world, like pheasant and crow feathers, to create something new entirely. The British sculptor uses a dozen verbs to describe what she does: “I gather, collate, re-use, layer, peel, burn, reveal, locate, question, duplicate, play and photograph.”



MccGwire was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 21. A statement describes how she began to use feathers in her work: “Growing up on the Norfolk Broads her connection with nature and fascination with birds was nurtured from an early age, with avian subjects and materials a recurring theme in her artwork.”




The results are visceral, absorbing entities that feel both kinetic and somehow alien. A recent exhibition, “Secrete,” brought her works to Galerie Huit in Hong Kong. The word has two meanings: concealing and generating. This duality is central to McGwire’s work, continuing to push new life into the world while depending on its existing creatures. And in a similar sense, there’s a wariness inspired by her sculptures and a magnetic quality.


Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Scotland-born sculptor Philip Jackson has crafted faithful depictions of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Mahatma Gandhi, and Sir Matt Busby and served as the Royal Sculptor to Queen Elizabeth II. Yet, Jackson’s also known for his modernist, dramatic gallery works, with characters that are less specific and in many cases, eerie and haunting. The quality present each of these works is Jackson’s seasoned knack for form and inspiring awe.
Wesley T. Wright’s stoneware sculptures put surreal touches on the natural world. His new show at La Luz de Jesus Gallery, titled “Ark of Man,” highlights the artist’s interest in folklore. The show runs April 5-28 at the Los Angeles venue. (Wright was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.)
In Kate MacDowell's recent work, subtle aspects of the animals she sculpts subvert expectations. Some of MacDowell’s new pieces are part of the new group show “Subversive Suburbia" at Mindy Solomon Gallery, kicking off on Friday. Her porcelain creatures and plantlife have long looked at both vulnerability and power of the natural world. MacDowell was last featured on HiFrucotose.com here.
Dutch artist duo We Make Carpets recently presented a huge, immersive carpet installation for "Kneeling," their piece for the Salon del Mobile 2015 in Milan, which took place in mid April. We Make Carpets collect ephemeral, throwaway items like cone-shaped party hats and dish sponges and arrange them into elaborate patterns inspired by Middle Eastern carpet-making traditions. Their colorful works were laid out on the floor at the Salon horizontally rather than hung up on a wall like in a typical gallery, encouraging viewers to circle around the installation to get the full effect.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List