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Martin Wittfooth Explores Clash of Contemporary Experience, Nature in New Show

New York artist Martin Wittfooth continues to explore the relationship between the contemporary experience and nature with a new show at Corey Helford Gallery titled “The Archaic Revival,” which runs through Oct. 29 at the space. The title of the show comes from ethnobotanist and philosopher Terence McKenna, who held a theory that society was reverting back to archaic values and norms in order to heal itself from a modern, poisonous condition. The artist, a Toronto native, is currently based in Brooklyn.


New York artist Martin Wittfooth continues to explore the relationship between the contemporary experience and nature with a new show at Corey Helford Gallery titled “The Archaic Revival,” which runs through Oct. 29 at the space. The title of the show comes from ethnobotanist and philosopher Terence McKenna, who held a theory that society was reverting back to archaic values and norms in order to heal itself from a modern, poisonous condition. The artist, a Toronto native, is currently based in Brooklyn.




The gallery offers insight into the artist’s latest body of work, on display this month: “Wittfooth’s latest series employs a variety of painting techniques, ranging from delicate and detailed brush treatments to heavily textured palette knife applications, and deliberate attention is given to the scale of the works to impart gravity and presence to the images.”




This current series is the first in which Wittfooth has ventured into the medium of bronze sculpture. In his oil paintings, the artist moves between techniques and approaches, from soft brushwork to textures rendered via palette knife. Wittfooth currently has a painting, titled “Incantation,” on view in Hi-Fructose’s “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose” exhibition at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, which runs through December 2016. Wittfooth was last featured on HiFructose.com here.


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