Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

“OPUS HYPNAGOGIA” Presents Surreal Works by Kris Kuksi, Martin Wittfooth, and More

Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn has assembled a rather eerie exhibition in cooperation with Morbid Anatomy Museum that pairs contemporary works with a wide variety of vernacular photography, folk sculpture, spirit photography, and more. "OPUS HYPNAGOGIA: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular" takes a look at creative enlightenment over the centuries, and explores our ongoing fascination with mental phenomena like Hypnagogia. On display will be recent works by the likes of Martin Wittfooth (HF Vol. 19 cover artist), Kris Kuksi (first covered in HF Vol. 19), Caitlin McCormack, El Gato Chimney, Rithika Merchant, and Hunter Stabler whose creations share a surreal quality or supernatural theme.


Martin Wittfooth “Shaman I” 2014 Courtesy of the artist.

Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn has assembled a rather eerie exhibition in cooperation with Morbid Anatomy Museum that pairs contemporary works with a wide variety of vernacular photography, folk sculpture, spirit photography, and more. “OPUS HYPNAGOGIA: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular” takes a look at creative enlightenment over the centuries, and explores our ongoing fascination with mental phenomena like Hypnagogia. On display will be recent works by the likes of Martin Wittfooth (HF Vol. 19 cover artist), Kris Kuksi (first covered in HF Vol. 19), Caitlin McCormack, El Gato Chimney, Rithika Merchant, and Hunter Stabler whose creations share a surreal quality or supernatural theme. This includes Kris Kuksi’s “Churchtank Type 12” 2015 sculpture, a monumental Baroque-style church on an army tank, which will make its debut in the exhibit. Take a look at our preview of the show below, which opens at the Morbid Anatomy Museum on July 18th.


Kris Kuksi “Churchtank type 12” 2015 Courtesy of Stephen Romano


Kris Kuksi “Churchtank type 12” 2015 Courtesy of Stephen Romano


Kris Kuksi “Churchtank type 12” 2015 Courtesy of Stephen Romano


Kris Kuksi “Churchtank type 12” 2015 Courtesy of Stephen Romano


Rithika Merchant “The Intruder” 2014 Courtesy of the artist.

Hunter Stabler “Tetris Graviton” 2014 hand cut paper Courtesy of the artist.

Caitlin McCormack Homewrecker 2014 crocheted cotton string and glue Courtesy of the artist.

El Gato Chimney Untitled Triptych 2015 watercolor on paper Courtesy of the artist

Joseph McVetty Untitled drawing 2015 Courtesy of Stephen Romano

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Artists' exploration of the unknown is an age-old practice — a notion that Stephen Romano Gallery's summer group show "Mysterium Cosmographicum" demonstrates with their diverse roster of artists, contemporary and historical. With its lofty theme, the show explores the role of the artist as prophet or shaman — simply put, someone who uses visual cues to access the spiritual side of human experience.
New York artist Martin Wittfooth continues to explore the relationship between the contemporary experience and nature with a new show at Corey Helford Gallery titled “The Archaic Revival,” which runs through Oct. 29 at the space. The title of the show comes from ethnobotanist and philosopher Terence McKenna, who held a theory that society was reverting back to archaic values and norms in order to heal itself from a modern, poisonous condition. The artist, a Toronto native, is currently based in Brooklyn.
In conjunction with "Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose" at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, painter Martin Wittfooth visits for a talk and Q&A on Thursday, Nov. 10. The narratives of the artist's paintings focus on animals, offering allegorical and dystopian tales of a post-human world. The artist created the cover for Hi-Fructose Volume 35. The talk, kicking off at 6:30 p.m., is free for museum members and $5 for non-members. Get more info here.
Trypophobia is the pathological fear of irregularly shaped holes. If looking at sponges, beehives, and raw meat makes you squirm, please look away. Colin Christian exploits people's innate discomfort with porous organic matter in his new work for his January 3 solo show, "Trypophobia" at Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn. While Christian's doll-like sculptures have been featured on our blog many times, this is his most grotesque body of work yet. Toothy holes gnaw at the silicone flesh of his large-scale characters as if an alien parasite has invaded their bodies. Some of the sculptures feature close-ups of festering skin, which Christian displays in a medical fashion. He is clearly unafraid to repulse viewers with this exhibit.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List