by Andy SmithPosted on

Oil painter and performance artist John Robinson crafts cerebral, wistful, and, at times, humorous self-portraits. His works, often rendered in monochromatic tones, sees the artist donning masks and contraptions that speaks to his current reflections. Elsewhere, he re-imagines moments of art history through his distinct filter.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Conveying elapsed time and bombastic energy, Mitchell Villa’s process involves long strokes and motions that use his entire body. The self-taught painter depicts scenes that range from Biblical allusions to horror to intimate domestic portraits. Works like the triptych “Dinner Party” show the artist’s penchant for controlled cacophony.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tokuhiro Kawai is known for paintings that both recall and satirize scenes from mythology. Yet, as his statement with Gallery Gyokuei reminds us, “The history of pictorial expression is history of reproduction.” In recent years, Kawai has specifically garnered popularity for the motif of felines donned in the garb of royalty.

by Andy SmithPosted on

There is seemingly no element too exotic to inhabit an oil painting by Alan MacDonald, whose works traverse cultures and histories to present something always elegant in execution. At the base of MacDonald’s work seems to be a need for adventure, exploring inspiration and varying perspectives in each work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At once lush and eerie, Sarah Slappey’s oil paintings offer vague limbs and organs against natural environments. Of her distinct visual language, she’s said “I wanted to build a world from the bottom up.” The South Carolina native, now residing in Brooklyn, New York, has recently shown these scenes at venues in New York City and Switzerland.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Pavel Guliaev describes his paintings as “subject realism,” a world that is wholly his yet invites viewers to conjure their own meanings. Shifting planes, along with figures and objects belonging to no specific time or place, are qualities that seem to exist across all of Guliaev’s work. The result is a scene both dreamlike and visceral.