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Hueman Illustrates “Just One Moment” in Time in New Solo

The work of Oakland based painter and street artist Allison Torneros, better known as Hueman, looks spontaneous, but to her, it is a science; a perfectly calculated blend of opposing elements. "I am constantly seeking balance between the beautiful and the grotesque, the abstract and the figurative, and that golden moment between sleep and awake," she says. Hueman's art has become instantly recognizable for its equally geometric and ethereal air, broken up as if seen through a colorful prism. Hueman elaborates on the ethereal aspects of her work with her latest exhibit "Just One Moment", which debuted over the weekend at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco.

The work of Oakland based painter and street artist Allison Torneros, better known as Hueman, looks spontaneous, but to her, it is a science; a perfectly calculated blend of opposing elements. “I am constantly seeking balance between the beautiful and the grotesque, the abstract and the figurative, and that golden moment between sleep and awake,” she says. Hueman’s art has become instantly recognizable for its equally geometric and ethereal air, broken up as if seen through a colorful prism. Hueman elaborates on the ethereal aspects of her work with her latest exhibit “Just One Moment”, which debuted over the weekend at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco. As her title might suggest, the series is meant to be seen as one. It is a look into a singular moment in time, spliced, dissected, and manipulated by Hueman’s abstract style often inspired by science fiction. The definition of “time” reads like a science fiction work. One view of time is that it is part of the fundamental structure of the universe, and it exists in a dimension independent of events. Hueman confronts this theory by providing her audience with images of the same subjects and motifs shown at different angles and events. In some pieces, figures seem to break free from their prismatic world while, in the background, stars and shining full moons peep through fractured compositions. Hueman pairs her acrylic and spray paint paintings with layered wall-mounted pieces, further extending this single moment into our dimension.

“Just One Moment” by Hueman is now on view at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco through October 10, 2015.

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