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Lauren YS, Moneyless, Troy Lovegates, and More Present New Works in “House Warming”

A new gallery joins the Bay area art scene tomorrow. Athen B. Gallery will celebrate their grand opening with "House Warming," an exhibition featuring new works by some familiar names to our blog, including Bret Flanigan, David Bray, Eric Bailey, Lauren YS, Moneyless, Troy Lovegates, Word to Mother, Zio Ziegler, and more. With this first showing, Athen B. introduces their eye for artists with roots in graffiti and urban art, Pop motifs and expressive palettes.


David Bray

A new gallery joins the Bay area art scene tomorrow. Athen B. Gallery will celebrate their grand opening with “House Warming,” an exhibition featuring new works by some familiar names to our blog, including Bret Flanigan, David Bray, Eric Bailey, Lauren YS, Moneyless, Troy Lovegates, Word to Mother, Zio Ziegler, and more. With this first showing, Athen B. introduces their eye for artists with roots in graffiti and urban art, Pop motifs and expressive palettes. Owner Brock Brake is no stranger to the street art scene. He first established himself as a photographer for artists like ROA, Gaia, and POSE, just to name a few, before later joining the ranks at White Walls and Shooting Gallery. Several of those artists he met along the way are exhibiting. This includes Lauren YS, recently featured here, who contributes a colorful ink portrait of one of her female characters. Her piece uses a more soft rendering, compared to her previously heavy graphic line work, which compliments her dreamy style. Troy Lovegates, covered here, also has a doodle-like drawing sensibility which shows in his monochromatic cut-out. His piece compliments Zio Zielger’s as well, portraying monochromatic black and white graphical figures with touches of red. Check out more of the pieces in “House Warming” below, on view at Athen B. Gallery from June 13 through July 3.


Lauren YS


Lauren YS (detail)


Word to Mother


Caleb Hahne


Caleb Hahne


Troy Lovegates


Aubrey Learner


Brett Flanigan


Moneyless


Zio Ziegler

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