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Felipe Pantone’s Murals Evoke Computer Glitches

The unintentional glitches of our computer screens are normally a nuisance, but they become the central focus of our attention when viewing Felipe Pantone's work. Pantone paints graphic patterns that evoke ones that appear on our devices only in the event of a terrible malfunction. The CMYK colors in his murals will look familiar to anyone who has ever dropped their laptop. Using spraypaint, Pantone plays with optical illusions, creating multilayered images that seem to shape-shift depending on the viewer's orientation. Pantone currently has a show on view at Delimbo Gallery in Sevilla, Spain. Check out some of his recent street art below.

The unintentional glitches of our computer screens are normally a nuisance, but they become the central focus of our attention when viewing Felipe Pantone’s work. Pantone paints graphic patterns that evoke ones that appear on our devices only in the event of a terrible malfunction. The CMYK colors in his murals will look familiar to anyone who has ever dropped their laptop. Using spraypaint, Pantone plays with optical illusions, creating multilayered images that seem to shape-shift depending on the viewer’s orientation. Pantone currently has a show on view at Delimbo Gallery in Sevilla, Spain. Check out some of his recent street art below.

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