Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Pose Paints Vibrant New Installation in Detroit’s Belt

Chicago artist Pose recently rocked an installation in Detroit’s Belt, an alley in the city’s downtown that has been converted into an outdoor art exhibition space, curated by Library Street Collective. Already filled with art from some of the world’s leading street and contemporary artists, Pose has added to the madness with his signature collage of vibrant colors and cartoony textures. See more photos after the jump, courtesy Library Street Collective.

Chicago artist Pose recently rocked an installation in Detroit’s Belt, an alley in the city’s downtown that has been converted into an outdoor art exhibition space, curated by Library Street Collective. Already filled with art from some of the world’s leading street and contemporary artists, Pose has added to the madness with his signature collage of vibrant colors and cartoony textures. Each section of the mural is painted with laser-like precision, and composed with the spontaneity of newspaper clippings spread across a table. What sets this piece apart from a lot of his previous work is the addition of 3D elements, integrating real objects, such as brightly colored steps and window panes into his mash of comic styled urban landscapes.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Bone, linseed oil, citrus extract from orange peels, earth paints and crayons- these are the materials of choice for Canadian urban artist Stefan Thompson. Thompson is studied in environmental science and looks to his surroundings for his medium and inspiration. Somewhere along the way to practicing art, he realized paint was toxic and set out to replace it with eco-friendly alternatives. Whether you find yourself walking through the city or woods near his studio, you might stumble upon a birch tree scorched into a mass of his organic characters. Among the work he’s exhibited is nontoxic acrylic paintings in surprising colors, stick sculptures like his Grassdeer, and reliefs of animals in driftwood, to name a few. Read more after the jump.
Inyoung Seoung's work draws parallels between humankind and nature. She considers people to be in a perpetual state of growth, reaching up and moving forward like trees to light. The Korea-born, Southern California-based artist one day found herself admiring her own backyard, where she was impressed by the fact that no two trees were alike, and that they contain an infinite supply of design that she emulates in her drawings and installations.
While it's possible to observe trees growing over the course of months and years, German artist David Stegmann aka Dust paints roots, branches and vines as sentient beings caught amid a state of evolution. In Dust's two latest murals, "Wohnzimmerwelten" and "Witness the Fitness," (both completed in Germany in the past two months) his otherworldly trees sprawl out across long walls (one of the pieces is 32 meters long) with force and momentum. The murals preceded the opening of Dust's current show, "Concrete Jungle," with Patricia Sandonis at Galerie Merkle in Stuttgart, Germany. Endowing plants with movement and speed is Dust's signature. The high-velocity branches take on new forms, reminding viewers of the powers that lie in the soil, the roots and the trees.
Kitt Bennett’s stirring, graphical murals have a particular resonance on paved parking lots, sprawling across urban spaces. The sheer size of these works gives viewers the chance to examine the details of his murals on an intimate level. For the past few years, the Melbourne-based artist has built a reputation in both illustration and public art (and he held a a solo show in a public toilet in 2015).

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List