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On View: “Carbon” New Works by Li-Hill at Cave Gallery

The work of Brooklyn based artist Li-Hill can be compared to a thunderstorm of images which dissipate into surrounding blank space. Like the element of "Carbon", the title of his series currently on view at C.A.V.E. Gallery, Li-Hill's illustrations break into tiny pieces that makeup a whole. The show is named after its inspiration. He chose to portray animals which are directly threatened by climate change due to carbon emissions. Jaguars, caribou, grizzly bears, wolves, and vultures are just a few represented in fleeting monochromatic graphite drawings smeared with aerosol, a carbon-concentrated material.

The work of Brooklyn based artist Li-Hill can be compared to a thunderstorm of images which dissipate into surrounding blank space. Like the element of “Carbon”, the title of his series currently on view at C.A.V.E. Gallery, Li-Hill’s illustrations break into tiny pieces that makeup a whole. The show is named after its inspiration. He chose to portray animals which are directly threatened by climate change due to carbon emissions. Jaguars, caribou, grizzly bears, wolves, and vultures are just a few represented in fleeting monochromatic graphite drawings smeared with aerosol, a carbon-concentrated material. In prelude to this exhibition, he also painted a large mural of Maned Wolves in the vicinity of the gallery. There lies a dilemma in Li-Hill’s concept, which promotes awareness of this environmental issue but also indirectly contributes to the use of carbon. As in the cycle of life, Li-Hill’s core theme, carbon has become an essential element in every step of his art making process.

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