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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

A Look at Rebecca Rose’s ‘Sculpturings’

Sculptor/jewelry artist Rebecca Rose crafts scenes in ring form, pulling from cultural iconography and allegorical narratives. Her so-called “Sculpturings” are described as “a hybrid of small sculpture and wearable art cast in precious metals using the lost wax casting process.” Her work has been shown in both galleries and jewelry showcases alike.


Sculptor/jewelry artist Rebecca Rose crafts scenes in ring form, pulling from cultural iconography and allegorical narratives. Her so-called “Sculpturings” are described as “a hybrid of small sculpture and wearable art cast in precious metals using the lost wax casting process.” Her work has been shown in both galleries and jewelry showcases alike.

“While emphasis on functional design is present, sculptural form and substance of message takes priority whether politically, allegorically, or satirically driven,” a Gauntlet Gallery statement says. “At first glimpse her work … merely reflect shiny, pretty objects. However when the viewer absorbs the symbolism and composition of each work they see a darker, gritty message at hand. Some of these pretty things tackle xenophobia, misogyny, class warfare, homophobia, oppression and vanity.”

See more of the artist’s work below.

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