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The Strange, Charming Figures of Troy Lovegates

Troy Lovegates may be known for high-profile work like murals and gallery installations, but the artist’s most absorbing work also comes through his strange, surreal figures. Lovegates, also known by the moniker "Other," applies his knack for shifting perspective into odd characters with acrylic on basswood. He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

Troy Lovegates may be known for high-profile work like murals and gallery installations, but the artist’s most absorbing work also comes through his strange, surreal figures. Lovegates, also known by the moniker “Other,” applies his knack for shifting perspective into odd characters with acrylic on basswood. He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here. A past statement explains his trajectory:

“(He) began painting on the streets in 1988 after noticing graffiti on the buildings in Toronto that would magically appear overnight,” it says. “A collector of images and experiences, he has a penchant for travel, a continuous movement, self-propelling his eyes past a static world as a way of animating his own streaming movie without much narrative.”

The artist’s work has appeared at shows in Tokyo, Paris, Dublin, Taipei, Los Angeles, Detroit, Lima, and beyond. See more of his recent sculptures below.

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