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Pierre Schmidt aka Drømsjel’s Latest Nietzsche-Inspired Collages

German artist Pierre Schmidt, also known as "Drømsjel" (previously covered here), creates mind-bending imagery that combines illustration and collage techniques. His works are partly inspired by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, who challenged ideas about individuality and the meaning of our existence. Other influences have included digital artists such as Lauren Albert, Christophe Remy, and Melissa Murillo. In his latest works, Drømsjel challenges Nietzsche's concepts through his manipulation of the form, which drips and doubles beyond recognition.

German artist Pierre Schmidt, also known as “Drømsjel” (previously covered here), creates mind-bending imagery that combines illustration and collage techniques. His works are partly inspired by German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, who challenged ideas about individuality and the meaning of our existence. Other influences have included digital artists such as Lauren Albert, Christophe Remy, and Melissa Murillo. In his latest works, Drømsjel challenges Nietzsche’s concepts through his manipulation of the form, which drips and doubles beyond recognition. Sometimes, as in his portrait “How to Disappear Completely”, where flowers emit from a girl’s eyes and mouth, the experience looks almost painful. To create these pieces, Drømsjel splices vintage 20th century style photographs with hand-drawn pencil sketches, which he then proceeds to embellish digitally. The result takes us to a surreal version of reality from another time, nostalgic and familiar yet a completely new dimension. Take a look at Drømsjel’s latest works below.

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