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Pierre Schmidt’s Psychedelic Collages and Illustrations

Berlin-based artist Pierre Schmidt's work floats freely between illustration and collage, traditional and digital. The artist splices vintage photographs of well-groomed ladies and gentlemen that evoke the standards of 20th-century propriety, turning them into bastions of surreal visions. In one piece, a cranium is cut open and in another, a face lifts off the head, implying a sort of out-of-body, psychedelic experience. Schmidt's drawings flow as freely and impulsively as doodles, with lots of frenetic line work reigned in by the geometric organization of each piece. Each piece a veritable mind trip, his work speaks to the day dreamers among us.

Berlin-based artist Pierre Schmidt’s work floats freely between illustration and collage, traditional and digital. The artist splices vintage photographs of well-groomed ladies and gentlemen that evoke the standards of 20th-century propriety, turning them into bastions of surreal visions. In one piece, a cranium is cut open and in another, a face lifts off the head, implying a sort of out-of-body, psychedelic experience. Schmidt’s drawings flow as freely and impulsively as doodles, with lots of frenetic line work reigned in by the geometric organization of each piece. Each piece a veritable mind trip, his work speaks to the day dreamers among us.

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