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Jennifer Presant Merges Everyday Places into Surreal Landscapes

Chicago based Jennifer Presant merges familiar, everyday places into mysterious landscapes. Her subjects vary from displaced household items and exposed figures in non-sensical, dramatically lit spaces. Looking at her work, we find ourselves staring into overwhemingly quiet scenes, such as an empty bedroom in the wilderness or middle of the ocean. Presant calls this mixture of environments a "visual metaphor" which symbolizes our ongoing experiences of time, memory, and relationship with physical space.

Chicago based Jennifer Presant merges familiar, everyday places into mysterious landscapes. Her subjects vary from displaced household items and exposed figures in non-sensical, dramatically lit spaces. Looking at her work, we find ourselves staring into overwhemingly quiet scenes, such as an empty bedroom in the wilderness or middle of the ocean. Presant calls this mixture of environments a “visual metaphor” which symbolizes our ongoing experiences of time, memory, and relationship with physical space. Her style stems from her creative background in graphic design, where shape and color carries the response of the viewer. Architectural elements frame each composition, evoking the feeling of being inside a theater set. The result is captivating in spite of their visual simplicity. At her website, Presant states, “With these paintings, the viewer’s imagination plays an important role in the piece, while also being implicated in the voyeurism depicted”.

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