Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Inside TeamLab’s Immersive ‘A Forest Where Gods Live’

At the Takeo Onsen hot springs in Japan, teamLab's immersive, massive installation has returned to the historic Mifuneyama Rakuen Park, now adding a daytime component to "A Forest Where Gods Live.” The teamLab exhibition differs from similar immersive efforts such as Meow Wolf and Onedome in that it uses an expansive outdoor space while paying homage to its history—as well as interactive elements.(teamLab was last featured here.)

At the Takeo Onsen hot springs in Japan, teamLab’s immersive, massive installation has returned to the historic Mifuneyama Rakuen Park, now adding a daytime component to “A Forest Where Gods Live.” The teamLab exhibition differs from similar immersive efforts such as Meow Wolf and Onedome in that it uses an expansive outdoor space while paying homage to its history—as well as interactive elements.(teamLab was last featured here.)

In acknowledgement of the hundreds of years since the creation of site shrines and ancient natural formations, teamLab says this: “We exist as a part of an eternal continuity of life and death, a process which has been continuing for an overwhelmingly long time. It is hard for us, however, to sense this in our everyday lives, perhaps because humans can not recognize longer time than their own life. When exploring the forest, the shapes of the giant rocks, the caves, and the forest allow us to better perceive and understand that overwhelmingly long time over which it all was formed.”

The exhibition runs through Nov. 4. Find teamLab on the web here.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
English artist Chris Wood creates glass wall-panels that showcase maze-like structures that give the illusion of depth and brilliance through the glass’ interaction with natural and artificial light sources. The artist’s usage of small, reflective, dichroic (meaning "two color") pieces of glass lets her easily create complex patterns of light and shade; the colors and textures that derive from these structures change in accordance to the position of the viewer and the angle of the light source, making her work an ever-changing, almost magical and intriguing phenomenon.
There’s a problematic aspect to Hiromi Tango’s sculptures that invites the viewer's intervention, simply because they are a complete mess. Tangled bits of string, plush and rigid baubles are knotted together into a bulbous hodgepodge around a core of light, sometimes with a single word sculpted in neon at the center. Strands of fabric and material reach out like dendrites on a neuron, feeling for a connection but isolated from everything on a blank white gallery wall, asking the viewer to sit a while and try to untangle it.
Nicki Crock is a conceptual artist currently working in Columbus, Ohio, but her head is in the clouds. Her installation series "Dream House" transforms space into an ethereal, geometric floating dreamscape made out of white paper. "A dream house is something to aspire to and long for," she says. "What better form could a daydream take shape in, than with something that we, as humans, already use to fulfill our imaginations: clouds."
Tara Donovan's sculptures look like they may have been built by an insect colony with a hive mind. One can imagine thousands of tiny creatures each carrying index cards or acrylic threads, dropping them to form a sculpture growing from a gallery floor. That is to say, Donovan's work process is highly repetitious, stacking, gluing and sculpting mundane materials until they begin to take on new, organic forms. Several of the artist's latest large-scale sculptures are currently on display in a dual exhibition at Pace Gallery's Menlo Park, CA and New York City art spaces.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List