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teamLab’s Latest Digital Installation is a 20,000 Sq Ft Magical Realm

Tokyo based collective known as teamLab describe themselves as "ultra-technologists", artists who seek to merge art, technology and design in their work, designed to allow viewers to have a more personal and unique connection with art. With Japanese designer Toshiyuki Inoko at the helm, the collective's installations are nothing short of magical- featured here on our blog, they are a spontaneous experience where artworks come to "life" as animation when approached by visitors. The secret to the magic behind their work is motion sensors that pick up the viewer’s movements, prompting paintings of the natural world to become a blooming and wilting garden of delights. Pace Art + Technology in Silicon Valley, California, seeking to create an environment that encourages educational play, invited teamLab to join their Future Park series- the result of which is "Living Digital Space and Future Parks" opening on February 6th.

Tokyo based collective known as teamLab describe themselves as “ultra-technologists”, artists who seek to merge art, technology and design in their work, designed to allow viewers to have a more personal and unique connection with art. With Japanese designer Toshiyuki Inoko at the helm, the collective’s installations are nothing short of magical- featured here on our blog, they are a spontaneous experience where artworks come to “life” as animation when approached by visitors. The secret to the magic behind their work is motion sensors that pick up the viewer’s movements, prompting paintings of the natural world to become a blooming and wilting garden of delights. Pace Art + Technology in Silicon Valley, California, seeking to create an environment that encourages educational play, invited teamLab to join their Future Park series- the result of which is “Living Digital Space and Future Parks” opening on February 6th.

Flowers and People, Cannot be Controlled but Live Together – A Whole Year per Hour from teamLab on Vimeo.

teamLab’s massive 22,000sq ft installation will feature immersive multi-room digital environments as well as showcase 20 digital artworks. This includes “Flutter of Butterflies Beyond Boarders”, which features digital butterflies with wings that have been programmed in real time, not pre-recorded, and constantly evolve. Though aimed at children, the project teaches a lesson that people of any age can appreciate: “With interactive artworks, the viewer’s actions and behavior can influence the state of the artwork at any particular moment,” writes Inoko at the teamLab website. “Then the important questions become: Was there another viewer there five minutes ago? How is the person next to you behaving? At the very least, even when you are looking at the painting, you will start to wonder about the person standing next to you. The change in the relationship between artworks and groups, and the impact on the relationship between viewers, has more potential to influence the relationships between the viewers.” “Living Digital Space and Future Parks” aspires to transform an individual’s creative action into a collaborative creative activity, and help kids realize that playing together might be more fun than playing alone.

Floating Flower Garden – Flowers and I are of the same root, the Garden and I are one (work in progress) from teamLab on Vimeo.

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