Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Amy Bennett Paints From Unexpected Vantage Points

Amy Bennett's engrossing paintings, with figures and objects rendered in a miniature scale, present scenes from the everyday from unexpected vantage points. These perspectives are aided by the artist first building "miniscule three-dimensional models" from wood, plastic, and other materials before she begins painting, says Miles McEnery Gallery. Her new show at the New York City gallery begins this week and runs through Aug. 16.

Amy Bennett’s engrossing paintings, with figures and objects rendered in a miniature scale, present scenes from the everyday from unexpected vantage points. These perspectives are aided by the artist first building “miniscule three-dimensional models” from wood, plastic, and other materials before she begins painting, says Miles McEnery Gallery. Her new show at the New York City gallery begins this week and runs through Aug. 16.

“In this new body of work, Bennett calls attention to these seemingly unremarkable moments of contemporary family life by painting them on a miniature scale, encouraging the viewer to take a closer look,” the gallery says. “ … By isolating fleeting and quotidian moments, Bennett invites the viewer to introspect on what is often overlooked. Upon close rinvestigation, these moments reveal themselves as more unsettling than comfortable. The artist’s use of differing perspectives—incorporating both bird’s eye views and zoomed-in close ups—simultaneously creates the comfort of context and a sense of disorientation.”

See more on Amy Bennett’s site and read more on Miles McEnery Gallery’s home on the web.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Oil painter and performance artist John Robinson crafts cerebral, wistful, and, at times, humorous self-portraits. His works, often rendered in monochromatic tones, sees the artist donning masks and contraptions that speaks to his current reflections. Elsewhere, he re-imagines moments of art history through his distinct filter.
In Hiroaki Ito’s paintings and drawings, he depicts Japanese businessmen—referred to as “salarymen” in their respective country—in perpetual states of submission, anguish, self-assuredness, and general unrest. His intimate angles, often below the subject, looking up, punctuate the moods he evokes with these suited, white-collar workers. These men and women are caught in mid-apology, somber reflection, or even near-vomiting.
Los Angeles-based artist Alex Gross (featured in HF Vol. 21) recently completed a series of oil paintings and mixed-media works for his upcoming show, "Future Tense," opening October 9 at NYC's Jonathan LeVine Gallery. His bright new works utilize realist techniques with such perfectionism that his characters more closely resemble Photoshopped models in magazines than anyone we'd encounter in real life. This glossy look adds to the impact of Gross's underlying cultural critique. Always plugged in and connected, his characters seem far from engaged in the present moment. While they pacify themselves with smartphones and junk food, their gazes look vacant and their happiness, fleeting.
Los Angeles based artist Soey Milk paints confident young women in boldly colored clothing inspired by the imagery of her Korean heritage. Featured here on our blog, her slightly amorous oil portraits are imbued with mystery and personal discovery. On October 1st at Hashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco, Milk explores her intimate world with a new series of paintings and drawings. In the tradition of previous exhibits, the series is titled in her native Korean "Pida (피다)", which translates to blossoming or becoming something else.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List