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Amy Bennett Paints From Unexpected Vantage Points

Amy Bennett's engrossing paintings, with figures and objects rendered in a miniature scale, present scenes from the everyday from unexpected vantage points. These perspectives are aided by the artist first building "miniscule three-dimensional models" from wood, plastic, and other materials before she begins painting, says Miles McEnery Gallery. Her new show at the New York City gallery begins this week and runs through Aug. 16.

Amy Bennett’s engrossing paintings, with figures and objects rendered in a miniature scale, present scenes from the everyday from unexpected vantage points. These perspectives are aided by the artist first building “miniscule three-dimensional models” from wood, plastic, and other materials before she begins painting, says Miles McEnery Gallery. Her new show at the New York City gallery begins this week and runs through Aug. 16.

“In this new body of work, Bennett calls attention to these seemingly unremarkable moments of contemporary family life by painting them on a miniature scale, encouraging the viewer to take a closer look,” the gallery says. “ … By isolating fleeting and quotidian moments, Bennett invites the viewer to introspect on what is often overlooked. Upon close rinvestigation, these moments reveal themselves as more unsettling than comfortable. The artist’s use of differing perspectives—incorporating both bird’s eye views and zoomed-in close ups—simultaneously creates the comfort of context and a sense of disorientation.”

See more on Amy Bennett’s site and read more on Miles McEnery Gallery’s home on the web.

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