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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Opening Night: Eduardo Kobra’s “Peace” at Dorothy Circus Gallery

Through his portraiture, Eduardo Kobra imparts powerful social messages simply by selecting the right subject. His recent mural in Rome, for example, was dedicated to Malala Yousafzai, the young social activist working to promote access to education for women in the Middle East. Kobra painted the new mural on the wall of the historical Museo dell’Altro e Dell’Altrove, which faces the Via Prenestina in Rome, a road that dates back to the Roman Empire. Read more after the jump.


Eduardo Kobra’s Malala mural. Photo by Giorgio de Finis.

Through his portraiture, Eduardo Kobra imparts powerful social messages simply by selecting the right subject. His recent mural in Rome, for example, was dedicated to Malala Yousafzai, the young social activist working to promote access to education for women in the Middle East. Kobra painted the new mural on the wall of the historical Museo dell’Altro e Dell’Altrove, which faces the Via Prenestina in Rome, a road that dates back to the Roman Empire.

Passersby can’t help but think of the issues Malala stands for when viewing the piece, which is precisely the goal of Dorothy Circus Gallery owner and curator Alexandra Mazzanti. Kobra’s mural and concurrent show at Dorothy Circus, “Peace,” is the first of a series of social activism-related art projects called “Spray For Your Rights.” For this series, different street artists whose work speaks out on a wide range of topics — from women’s rights to racial discrimination — will be showing at Dorothy Circus Gallery throughout the year. Kobra’s show “Peace,” which features a series of vibrant, kaleidoscopic portraits of prominent humanitarians, will be on view through June 25.

Photo credit: Jacopo Tantaro and Stefano Restivo


The mural in progress.


The mural in progress.


The mural in progress.


Detail of the finished mural. Photo by Giorgio de Finis.


Eduardo Cobra with Dorothy Circus Gallery owner Alexandra Mazzanti


A crowd gathers at the opening reception for “Peace.”

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