Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Martin C. Herbst’s Distorted Oil Paintings on Aluminum Foil

Vienna, Austria based artist Martin C. Herbst embraces distortion in his paintings, spanning from flat, wavy, and convex surfaces to the rounded shapes of stainless steel spheres. In his ongoing series on folded aluminum, Herbst presents classical portraiture in a new and unconventional way. This body of work is in part inspired by Mannerism, specifically the work of Mannerist painter Parmigianino, whose style emphasized elongated proportions and highly stylized poses with no clear perspective.

Vienna, Austria based artist Martin C. Herbst embraces distortion in his paintings, spanning from flat, wavy, and convex surfaces to the rounded shapes of stainless steel spheres. In his ongoing series on folded aluminum, Herbst presents classical portraiture in a new and unconventional way. This body of work is in part inspired by Mannerism, specifically the work of Mannerist painter Parmigianino, whose style emphasized elongated proportions and highly stylized poses with no clear perspective. In the 16th century, all mirrors were convex, and when Parmigianino looked at his reflection to paint his “Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror”, everything appeared distorted. Herbst takes this concept one step further, painting in oil on folded mirror-polished aluminum, where the subject’s face and eyes appear to break apart and are reassembled into Cubist-like form. As one moves around each piece, its mirror finish offers a variety of reflections, including that of the space it is in, where no two perspectives are alike. The once two dimensional portrait immediately becomes sculptural, even interactive, an experience that Herbst likens to discovering “hidden treasures”, the title of this series.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
With "Bone Pendulum in Motley" at Freight+Volume Gallery, Johnston Foster offers new, wild assemblages made from metal hardware, textiles and plastics, PVC, yoga mats, electrical wires, and other materials typically reserved for home renovation projects. Kicking off tomorrow and running through Nov. 10 at the gallery, several new pieces are included in the show.
Chiharu Shiota has called her thread installations “drawings in space.” Using antique furniture and other objects evoking memory, her work has explored how we're tethered to the past and each other. Shiota's work, and her performance art, has recently taken over spaces at KODE-Art Museum of Bergen in Norway, Museum Nikolaikirche in Berlin, Kenji Taki Gallery in Japan, and SCAD Museum of Art in Georgia. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.
The fantastic wire creations of Walter Oltmann seem both alien and familiar. The artist often calls upon the natural world and images from human history to explore themes of hybridism and mutation while referencing the rich traditions of South African craft-making. Born in 1960, Oltmann spent his childhood living in remote parts of the KwaZulu-Natal region, where he was first exposed to local handicrafts such as weaving and basket-making. Using wire as his preferred medium, the artist has become an expert on wire working and devotes himself to studying the influence of cultural traditions on contemporary South African art.
Beautiful. Gaudy. Elegant. Sensitive. These are not words one hears too often when discussing the subject of basketball. San Francisco based artist Victor Solomon has brought some sparkle to the sport with his series of elegant stained glass basketball boards that move the luxury lifestyle of the players onto the court. First featured on our blog last year, Solomon's "Literally Balling" series makes a connection between the glamour of being a professional athlete and the historical opulence formerly reserved for royalty.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List