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Martin C. Herbst’s Transfigurative ‘Sphere’ Sculptures

Martin C. Herbst's “Spheres” are transforming, painted faces on stainless steel spheres, seemingly shifting expressions as viewers move the pieces or their perspectives. The artist was inspired by Parmigianino’s 1500s painting “Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror," known for its distorted effect. Herbst was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

Martin C. Herbst‘s “Spheres” are transforming, painted faces on stainless steel spheres, seemingly shifting expressions as viewers move the pieces or their perspectives. The artist was inspired by Parmigianino’s 1500s painting “Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror,” known for its distorted effect. Herbst was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.


“Since the face is depicted on a round picture carrier, the painting expands from its two-dimensional origin to the third dimension resulting in a stunniNg hybrid of painting and sculpture,” a statement says. “Flat painting becomes multi-perspective as soon as the betrayer walks around the sphere. The sphere sits unpaired on a nearly invisible supporting ring and the betrayer can position the work at will – with remarkable consequences: the face seems to change its expression to a certain extent according to its alignment in space.”

See more work from Herbst below.

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