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Nicomi Nix Turner, Naoto Hattori, and More Interpret Their Safe Havens

On August 15th, New York welcomed a new gallery, Haven Gallery, with their inaugural exhibition inspired by the idea of safe havens. Their first group of artists have wide ranging styles, many sharing whimsical qualities: Matt Dangler, Kukula (HF Vol. 7), Kari-lise Alexander, Nicomi Nix Turner, Dan Quintana (HF Vol. 27), Shaun Berke, Tom Bagshaw, Naoto Hattori (HF Vol. 7), Zoe Byland, Brian Mashburn, Regan Rosburg, Aunia Kahn, Caitlin McCormack, Rose Freymuth-Frazier, Redd Walitzki, and Nom Kinnear King. Their subjects span still life, landscapes, and figurative works, suggesting that refuge can be found both in the physical as well as within oneself.


Brian Mashburn

On August 15th, New York welcomed a new gallery, Haven Gallery, with their inaugural exhibition inspired by the idea of safe havens. Their first group of artists have wide ranging styles, many sharing whimsical qualities: Matt Dangler, Kukula (HF Vol. 7), Kari-lise Alexander, Nicomi Nix Turner, Dan Quintana (HF Vol. 27), Shaun Berke, Tom Bagshaw, Naoto Hattori (HF Vol. 7), Zoe Byland, Brian Mashburn, Regan Rosburg, Aunia Kahn, Caitlin McCormack, Rose Freymuth-Frazier, Redd Walitzki, and Nom Kinnear King. Their subjects span still life, landscapes, and figurative works, suggesting that refuge can be found both in the physical as well as within oneself. North Carolina based artist Brian Mashburn, for instance, portrays an atmospheric image of a tree titled “Live Oak”, which seems to erupt from the ground in spite of the industry that looms behind it. Trees have been historically used as symbols of refuge, or evocation in some religions. Nicomi Nix Turner also explores religious connotation of refuge in her drawing “Visions of the Heretic”, referring to religious heresy. Naoto Hattori, on the other hand, has often described his own art making as a sort of escape or haven from reality. In one of the exhibit’s more playful images, he paints an Alice-like little girl in her wonderland with a regal ‘Bigfoot’ rabbit. Take a look at more images from Haven Gallery’s inaugural exhibit below, on view through September 24th.


Nicomi Nix Turner


Redd Waltizki


Zoe Byland


Tom Bagshaw


Kukula


Kari-Lise Alexander


Naoto Hattori


Caitlin McCormack


Dan Quintana


Matt Dangler


Regan Rosberg


Nom Kinnear King

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