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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Tag: Nicomi Nix Turner

It's the 40th print volume of Hi-Fructose! Our next issue arrives in stores everywhere July 1st but you can pre-order it from us today here! Featured in this issue is: Mark Mothersbaugh's new museum retrospective at the Akron Museum of Art, the elaborate skull carvings of Jason Borders, a studio visit with Japanese artist collective three, the wonderful drawings of Nicomi Nix Turner, photographer Robert Bartholot's mysteriously artificial images, Nicole Gordon's bright and tragic landscapes, and Vincent Castiglia's amazing blood paintings. Then we delve into the violence of man with Cleon Peterson's graphic paintings, discover the cinematic baroque paintings of Jamie Adams, and review on the new Peelander Z documentary Mad Tiger! Plus, this issue also includes a special 16-page insert section of cover artist Charlie Immer. Immerse yourself in his brilliantly colored ghastly world in this special full color gloss section. View more sample previews here! Pre-order Hi-Fructose Vol.40 here!
35,000 years ago, man picked up some bones and charcoal off the ground and drew his first cave painting- only instead of painting a picture of himself, he painted animals. He watched the herds cross the plains and thought they were beautiful and magical, and retained this image in his mind and translated them on the cave walls with graceful and accurate curves. A new group exhibition titled "Animalia" at Abend Gallery in Colorado will showcase contemporary artists whose work has been influenced by animals, and takes a look at how we relate to them today.
For centuries, the wonders of the natural world have inspired artists to create fantasy, and since the Middle Ages, have applied legendary characteristics to animals. For the fourth year in a row, Antler Gallery in Portland has invited artists to join in this tradition of creating their own mythical creatures inspired by nature. "Unnatural Histories 4" will highlight whimsical new works by Lisa Ericson, Jeff P., Jon Mcnair, Erika Sanada, Josh Keyes, Peter Gronquist, Josie Morway, Brin Levinson, Jessica Joslin, Matt Linares, Aunia Kahn, Nicomi Nix Turner, and more.

On August 15th, New York welcomed a new gallery, Haven Gallery, with their inaugural exhibition inspired by the idea of safe havens. Their first group of artists have wide ranging styles, many sharing whimsical qualities: Matt Dangler, Kukula (HF Vol. 7), Kari-lise Alexander, Nicomi Nix Turner, Dan Quintana (HF Vol. 27), Shaun Berke, Tom Bagshaw, Naoto Hattori (HF Vol. 7), Zoe Byland, Brian Mashburn, Regan Rosburg, Aunia Kahn, Caitlin McCormack, Rose Freymuth-Frazier, Redd Walitzki, and Nom Kinnear King. Their subjects span still life, landscapes, and figurative works, suggesting that refuge can be found both in the physical as well as within oneself.

On April 24, Paradigm Gallery + Studio in Philadelphia will debut two solo shows that explore humans' connection to nature: Nicomi Nix Turner's "No God for a Wanderer" and Sarah Louise Davey's "The Garden of No Distant Place." While Davey works in clay and Turner, in pencil, the two artists share a common interest in feminine, nymph-like characters that seem to belong in the wild.
Though Nicomi Nix Turner's subtle graphite work resembles an intricate examination of the natural world, one would be surprised to learn that the artist uses absolutely no reference material. The skinny, springy mushrooms and horned beetles that often appear in her drawings are not modeled after a particular species. Instead, Turner enjoys playing god, in a way, and seeing what an ecosystem of her own creation would look like. People often tell her the human characters in her work resemble someone they know, said the artist, but perhaps the beauty of their faces is that they can evoke different memories for each viewer.

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