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Naoto Hattori’s New, Dreamlike Creatures

Naoto Hattori's creatures are both vivid and dreamlike, rendered in vibrant acrylics. The Japan-born artist creates absorbing work teeming with innocence. Each bends expectation and reality into beings alternate between disconcerting and ambrosial. Hattori was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.


Naoto Hattori‘s creatures are both vivid and dreamlike, rendered in vibrant acrylics. The Japan-born artist creates absorbing work teeming with innocence. Each bends expectation and reality into beings alternate between disconcerting and ambrosial. Hattori was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

“My vision is like a dream, whether it’s a sweet dream, a nightmare, or just a trippy dream. I try to see what’s really going on in my mind, and that’s a practice to increase my awareness in stream-of-consciousness creativity. I try not to label or think about what is supposed to be, just take it in as it is and paint whatever I see in my mind with no compromise. That way, I create my own vision.”

Hattori graduated with a BFA in illustration from the School of Visual Arts in 2000. She’s since garnered awards from Society of Illustrators and international competitions.

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