Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

London’s “Sculpture in the City” Presents Public Art by Damien Hirst, Ai Weiwei, and More

For five years in a row, the open air exhibition "Sculpture in the City" has brought some of the best contemporary artists to the public in London. Opening this week on July 9th, this year's installment will feature new works by Ekkehard Altenburger, Bruce Beasley, Adam Chodzko, Ceal Floyer, Laura Ford, Damien Hirst, Shan Hur, Folkert de Jong, Sigalit Landau, Kris Martin, Keita Miyazaki, Tomoaki Suzuki, Xavier Veilhan, and Ai Weiwei. The exhibit merges the new with the old as their works are set against the city's most historic landmarks. Take a look at more photos of Sculpture in the City 2015 as it comes together, after the jump.


Damien Hirst (Photo by Nick Turpin)

For five years in a row, the open air exhibition “Sculpture in the City” has brought some of the best contemporary artists to the public in London. Opening this week on July 9th, this year’s installment will feature new works by Ekkehard Altenburger, Bruce Beasley, Adam Chodzko, Ceal Floyer, Laura Ford, Damien Hirst, Shan Hur, Folkert de Jong, Sigalit Landau, Kris Martin, Keita Miyazaki, Tomoaki Suzuki, Xavier Veilhan, and Ai Weiwei. The exhibit merges the new with the old as their works are set against the city’s most historic landmarks. This includes Damien Hirst’s “Charity” (2002-2003), which was just unveiled outside the capital’s Gherkin building, is one of the artist’s most iconic pieces representing charity and disability. It depicts a little girl, standing over 22-feet tall, wrapped in metal leg braces clutching her teddy bear and a collection box that reads “Please give generously.” Japanese artist Tomoaki Suzuki also has work in the Gherkin plaza – tiny figures modeled after every day London urbanites. His sculptures are a contemporary twist on the millennia-long tradition of Japanese woodcarving. Suzuki bases each piece on an actual person, who is photographed and then meticulously scaled down to one third of their size, before being colored with acrylic paint. In addition, the debut of Ai Weiwei’s (covered here) public installation will coincide with his September exhibition at the Royal Academy of London. Take a look at more photos of Sculpture in the City 2015 as it comes together below, courtesy of the organizers and founder Stella Ioannou.


Damien Hirst (Photo by Nick Turpin)


Damien Hirst 


Adam Chodzko (Photo by Nick Turpin)


Tomoaki Suzuki (Photo by Nick Turpin)


Tomoaki Suzuki (Photo by Nick Turpin)


Tomoaki Suzuki


Tomoaki Suzuki


Tomoaki Suzuki


Folkert de Jong


Folkert de Jong


Bruce Beasley


Sigalit Landau


Kris Martin (Photo by Benny Proot)

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
The sculptures of Kim Won Geun depict underworld characters with unexpected vulnerability and humor. Often crafted in wood or epoxy resin and acrylics, these works range in size, yet have garnered fans across art fairs in handheld heights. The artist’s work recently turned heads at CONTEXT Art Miami in December.
Nora Unda’s otherworldly animals are inspired by our real-world manipulation of the natural world. The plasticine creatures appear with multiple heads, or elsewhere, without any at all, existing as both graceful and disturbing creations. The author offers some insight into both her process and her driving themes.
Decorative metalworking in Japan has a long history that began sometime in the fourth to fifth centuries with skills passed down through the generations. Tokyo based sculptor Taiichiro Yoshida conforms to century old traditions in his hot-metal treated sculptures of flower-encrusted animals. Snow monkeys, rabbits, cats, and birds like sparrows and doves are just a few of the animals that he represents in his work, coated with layers of intricate metal florals and feathers in various colors.
Lucy McRae's new "Compression Carpet offers a full embrace for those who feel like they need a hug, a meditation on how technology can aid intimacy or support. The "body architect" recently showed the device at Festival of the Impossible in San Francisco. For some, the device may recall the hug machine created by Temple Grandin for stress relief and therapy. With her device, McCrae says, you "relinquish control to the hands of a stranger as your 'servicer' decides the firmness of your hug."

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List