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Recap: Forest For the Trees Mural Festival In Portland, Continued

Yesterday we brought you our first recap of Portland's second annual edition of Forest for the Trees, a new mural festival featuring 20 international and local artists. Today, we round up the rest of the murals. Philadelphia-based artist Nosego played with negative space for his piece, which sparkles on a small section of his giant wall with glowing contrasts. Nearby, Brendan Monroe and Souther Salazar collaborated almost seamlessly, blending whimsy with geometry and design. Paige Wright incorporated three-dimensional elements into her mural while Zach Yarrington opted to create text-based work. Take a look at the highlights after the jump.

Yesterday we brought you our first recap of Portland’s second annual edition of Forest for the Trees, a new mural festival featuring 20 international and local artists. Today, we round up the rest of the murals. Philadelphia-based artist Nosego played with negative space for his piece, which sparkles on a small section of his giant wall with glowing contrasts. Nearby, Brendan Monroe and Souther Salazar collaborated almost seamlessly, blending whimsy with geometry and design. Paige Wright incorporated three-dimensional elements into her mural while Zach Yarrington opted to create text-based work. Take a look at the highlights below.

Rather Severe:

Nosego:

Paige Wright:

Ryuichi Ogino:

Souther Salazar and Brendan Monroe:

Spencer Keeton Cunningham:

The Lost Cause:

Zach Yarrington:

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Patterns dance in Nosego's paintings of morphing creatures that shed their skins to be reborn as psychedelic spirit animals. The Philadelphia-based artist pays homage to various endangered species in his work and paints them in an optimistic light. Whether in his street art or in the studio, Nosego fills his work with interlocking designs that distort his chosen animals' anatomies into something otherwordly. He remixes familiar imagery into whimsical compositions with dizzying details.
Public art and murals add an imaginative dimension to the daily humdrum of city life — a cause public art project Forest For The Trees is championing in Portland at Hellion Gallery. The gallery is currently hosting a two-week pop-up fundraiser show for FFTT, which is gearing up for a mural series in late August featuring the likes of Blaine Fontana, DAL, Faith47, Know Hope, Mary Iverson and many other international and Portland-based artists. The current group show at Hellion Gallery features works from a small selection of artworks from some of the participants: an assemblage by Fontana, psychedelic paintings by Brendan Monroe, a landscape collage by Mary Iverson and more. The exhibition is on view through May 30. Stay tuned for news about the Forest For The Trees mural series later this summer.
“Paramnesia”, like déjà vu, refers to a supernatural phenomenon in which dreams or fantasies are confused with reality. Joram Roukes explores this concept with his exhibition of the same name, which opened last weekend at Thinkspace Gallery. Previously, Roukes’ work centered on reflections of daily life experiences reassembled in surreal, painterly scenes. For the past six months, he collected new experiences while working in Los Angeles. The result is slightly schizophrenic. Throughout, exotic animals erupt from anonymous figures performing a variety of city professions. In a way, it recalls Craola’s use of anthromorphic characters to personify dreams (covered here), only Roukes’ are sourced from a place more terrifying- reality.
In its second year, Forest for the Trees, curated by gallerist Matt Wagner and artist Gage Hamilton, brought together 20 international and local artists in Portland for a few days of mural painting intended to encourage the growth of public art in a city already known for its creative flair. Unlike other street art festivals around the world, Forest for the Trees had a notable presence of artists you wouldn't necessarily put in the street art or graffiti camps.

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