Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Ornate Antler Sculptures by Shane Wilson

Canadian artist Shane Wilson draws his inspiration from the nature surrounding him in north Ontario. In his artist statement, he writes, "I live through my hands and tools: transforming thick, heavy bone and bronze, meant for massive collisions, into ethereal, otherworldly creations; precious oases in the midst of life." Sourced ethically, his ornate carvings into animal antlers, particularly moose, are unreal. They balance the beauty of the animal with the severity and aggressive nature of the antlers' former life. With careful workmanship, Wilson summons tiny, peaceful scenes of Canada's wilderness, such as Grizzly bears fishing and wolves howling in the night.

Canadian artist Shane Wilson draws his inspiration from the nature surrounding him in north Ontario. In his artist statement, he writes, “I live through my hands and tools: transforming thick, heavy bone and bronze, meant for massive collisions, into ethereal, otherworldly creations; precious oases in the midst of life.” Sourced ethically, his ornate carvings into animal antlers, particularly moose, are unreal. They balance the beauty of the animal with the severity and aggressive nature of the antlers’ former life. With careful workmanship, Wilson summons tiny, peaceful scenes of Canada’s wilderness, such as Grizzly bears fishing and wolves howling in the night. Some pieces measure over a meter high and feature more abstract patterns. For example, “Borealis and Oreithyia”, an impressive set of moose antlers, is Wilson’s curvy interpretation of the Northern Lights. Such works merge the creative imaginings of man with the natural world. His first experimentations followed a visit to an exhibition of other antler carvings, but after a period of time, Wilson has honed in on a unique vision. Today, his pieces are commissioned all over the world, most recently on display at Museum of Post Contemporary Art, Virtual Gallery. Take a look at more of his works below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Recent creatures crafted in the workshop of Calvin Ma make seem endearing and childlike. Yet, Ma’s ceramic sculptures are part of an ongoing, cathartic purpose, the artist says. In a statement, he describes why it was “ natural to tap into this childlike sense of exploration and storytelling through my artwork.”
New Jersey-based sculptor Jedediah Morfit uses a bas-relief process that resembles ancient techniques, yet implement modern materials like urethane plastic. These flattened sculptures appear as both two- and three-dimensional. In a statement, the artist explains his influences:
In Peter Palfi's "Looney Tombs" series, the mythologies of Ancient Egyptian gods and 20th-century animation synthesize with artifacts faithful to both histories. The Hungarian artist uses bronze, wood, resin, actual mummified animals, and other materials to craft these sculptures—along with his own complete Book of the Dead. For some, it may recall Damien Hirst's "Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable," though Palfi's work, in concept, wholly embraces the absurd.
Beautiful. Gaudy. Elegant. Sensitive. These are not words one hears too often when discussing the subject of basketball. San Francisco based artist Victor Solomon has brought some sparkle to the sport with his series of elegant stained glass basketball boards that move the luxury lifestyle of the players onto the court. First featured on our blog last year, Solomon's "Literally Balling" series makes a connection between the glamour of being a professional athlete and the historical opulence formerly reserved for royalty.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List